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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS, c. 1918

Bread and Water: 1906

Bread and Water: 1906

"Steamer loading grain from floating elevator." Continuing our visit to the New Orleans waterfront circa 1906. 8x10 inch glass negative. View full size.

 

The vessel being loaded

is the Traveller, owned by Charente Steamship Company of London. Launched June 22, 1888 at Scotstoun, outside Glasgow, by Charles Connell & Co. Sold in 1919 to the Limerick Steamship Co. of Ireland, and renamed Inishboffin, it wrecked on Wulff Island, Gulf of Finland, on December 13, 1921. Refloated the following May, the vessel was broken up at Hamburg in 1923.

Convenient Grain

Engineers and Engineering, Engineers Club of Philadelphia, 1922.

Grain Handling

When grain forms only a small portion of the cargo, grain is put aboard by the use of floating elevators brought to them in grain barges, while other miscellaneous merchandise is being loaded at a freight pier. This saves the time and expense, which would be required to move the vessel from the freight pier to the grain elevator to take on the balance of the cargo.

New Orleans?

Hmmm. No levy but there should be. There isn't much to go by here but looks more Savannah to me. The "elevator" is transferring grain from No. 67 to the steamship.

[The "levy" (levee) would be in the vicinity of the telegraph poles, the same ones seen here. - Dave]

 
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