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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • STAY ONE JUMP AHEAD OF TROUBLE, 1945

High Sierra: 1930s

High Sierra: 1930s

Yosemite National Park seems to have been a favorite of this family throughout the years. I do not know the identity of the woman but she is in quite a few other pictures I have. View full size.

High Sierra: 1941

The remake with Ida Lupino was better.

Boot Laces

Not a standard length at the local hardware.

Re: Worm carrier

They caught plenty of fish.

Worm carrier.

That is what the unit is attached to her belt in front of her belly. It rotates, and a hinged lid can be lifted, allowing access to the worms. You could add some moist soil to keep the worms fresh. Close the lid, and rotating it back locks the lid and keeps the worms from falling out. I used to have one.

Oh, and I envy those that traveled this state in the wilds back in those days. I bet they had the fishing all to themselves. Didn't have to sign a permit either.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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