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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • STAY ONE JUMP AHEAD OF TROUBLE, 1945

Wrecked Haynes: 1920

Wrecked Haynes: 1920

Washington, D.C., circa 1920. "Wayne Smith Auto Co. -- wrecked Haynes sedan." Out second glimpse at the operations of this long-forgotten car dealer. National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Wrecked By a Haynes?

I must concur with the comment made by Hayslip that the cars is actually an Oldsmobile. Maybe the Oldmobile owner was hit by a Haynes or traded the Olds in on a new Haynes.

The combination of extra glass panels on the side of the windshield, the tapering wheel hubs with a hexagon incised, the looped door handle, and the number of canted hood louvers all point towards a circa 1916 Oldsmobile.

A picture of another 1916 Oldsmobile is below.

When is a Haynes not a Haynes

I suggest the damaged car is an Oldsmobile, not a Haynes. A look at similar photos especially the hood of the Oldsmobile truck in an earlier Shorpy will confirm this. The fact that it is at a Haynes dealership is coincidental.

Three-door sedan

Is this another attempt at just one door on the curb side of the car? I see what looks like the shape of afront door, but there is no handle or mounting point visible. This car did get repaired though, it obviously belonged to da Boss.

MKH

Note the monogram.

Insist that

genuine OEM Haynes parts be used to make the repair.

That'll buff right out

Since that car recently cost somewhere in the neighborhood of eight times as much as a Ford it probably didn't stay totaled for long, some enterprising fellow with a blowtorch and lead-paddles would've had it back on the road in short order.

Totalled

Great Caesar's Ghost, there must be at least $50 in damage there!!

Headlight prints

Visible are what appear to be the imprints of the culprit's headlights and grille.

It has to be said

That'll buff right out!

Active restraints? What active restraints?

Side curtain airbags? Who needs 'em? Why, in my day, we hit our heads against the windows, and we *liked it*!

Quite an Impression

The marks left in the side panels of this Haynes sedan clearly show just what happened. The other car's headlights and radiator, flanked by its fenders are easily seen. Classic T-bone collision. Now, could one of our antique car aficionados identify the culprit's make for us?

Wow!

The side airbags didn't even deploy!

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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