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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • UNFAIR TO BABIES, 1936

The Granary: 1910

The Granary: 1910

Buffalo, New York, circa 1910. "Canal harbor and elevators." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

Straight out of a Sheeler Painting

I immediately thought of a Charles Sheeler urbanscape.

Sideways

If you look at the smaller silos (?) alongside the large elevator you can see they are on rail trucks and evidently can be moved along the wharf to accommodate various vessels.

[The Connecting Terminal Elevator in action circa 1900. - Dave]

Steamer James Gayley

The ship unloading grain appears to be the bulk freighter James Gayley.

  • Built: 1902 by the American Ship Building Company, Cleveland hull #410.
  • Gross Tonnage: 4777, Net Tonnage: 3359.
  • Keel/Beam/Depth: 416x50x28.
  • Owner: Mitchell & Co., Cleveland.
  • Lost: Aug 7, 1912, on Lake Superior in thick fog — struck on the starboard side by the steamer Rensselaer. The James Gayley, burdened with a load of coal, sank 20 minutes after the impact. All those aboard, including 5 women, were safely recovered by the Rensselaer which remained afloat. The wreck lies 35-40 miles east of Manitou Island.

The area is still the same

I believe that this was shot near where S. Michigan Avenue used to cross over the inner canal.

First fruits of the new age!

I had no idea these massive grain elevators existed in Buffalo. Very impressive. It even excited Le Corbusier.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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