The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE TOY DEPARTMENT, 1913

Safe: 1924

Safe: 1924

February 25, 1924. Washington, D.C. "Miss Ann O'Connell." Evidently not one to run (or drive) with the fast crowd. National Photo Co. View full size.

 

Campaign to Cut Crossing Wrecks

Where it all began (NYT link):

Cautious in Color

I give you my crude and amateurish attempt at colorization. It shouldn't take long to see that I am inept at Photoshop so I cheated with a quick cut & paste.

[Certainly an improvement on her boring gray poster! - Dave]

T-H-A-T

"Railroad crossing, look out for the cars. Can you spell that without any R's?" Wish I had a nickel for every time I heard it in the '50s.

Off the Cuff

One of those Shorpy moments I regret the monochrome - I would love to see the colours in Miss O'Connell's dress. The Futurist sleeves could have come straight out of the film "Metropolis" and must have been the cutting edge of fashion in 1924.

Original artwork.

This may be a watercolor painted on an illustration board or watercolor board. Note the hand lettered headline. The subhead (Cross Crossings Cautiously) looks to be typeset and could have been pasted onto the artwork. The next step would be to take it to the engraver for printing plates (if this was meant for reproduction)!

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2014 Shorpy Inc.