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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SYPHILIS ... SIX OUT OF TEN CURED, 1941

Thanksgiving Dinner: 1924

Thanksgiving Dinner: 1924

Washington, D.C., circa 1924. "Park View Citizens Association store." National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Bird slaughter

Brings to mind what our landlords did in the UK c. 1953. They fenced off most of the field that we had our (rented) 33' house trailer on to raise a flock of geese. They were hardly the most friendly of birds, but it was still something of a trauma for a six year old when the gents showed up to wring their necks and hang them from the clotheslines by their feet near dusk on an overcast day.

It's quality not quantity that counts

Willing to bet those "skinny" turkeys tasted a lot better than today's force-fed monstrosities.

[Turkeys are not "force fed." According to my late grandma, born 1904, the turkeys of old were "miserable stringy things." - Dave]

Color me contrary

As an old timer who used to really look forward to a fresh farm-raised turkey on holidays, I now find the modern supermarket turkey bland, unnatural and chemical-tasting. In my opinion, they have managed to breed the real turkey flavor right out of it, making it more like the common, industrially raised ordinary chicken, which also ain't what it used to be. The obsession with huge breasts (in other species besides poultry) and larger portions of white meat seem to have extracted the true essence of real turkey taste completely out of the bird. Either that or my old taste buds have bitten the dust. P.S. I also happen to be partial to dark meat, particularly thighs.

Skinny turkeys

Looks like more bone and skin than meat. Thank goodness for genetic improvements over the years since this picture was taken that have resulted in far better birds for our Thanksgiving tables.

Yes Ma'am

You just put one hand here and rip off the leg with your other hand, it's that simple.

Gobble, gobble, gobble.

Butterball has come a long way since then.

Kind of Sad

We don't usually think much of the turkeys we cook for Thanksgiving but seeing them piled up like this, still with some feathers showing and with their necks hanging down bothers me. The guy on the right looks like he feels bad too.

Food to be thankful for

Looks like, chestnuts, cranberries, sweet potatoes, apples, pomegranates(?), Domino Golden Syrup, Libby's Evaporated milk,and soups. Of course, the Turkeys.

[On the right, apples and two crates of Royal Poinciana oranges. In the middle: turnips. - Dave]

Oxtail

It is the first "full can view of Campbell Soup" on the right side of the picture.

Oxtail soup

I know that oxtail was one of the original Campbell's soups. I can also see vegetable, consomme and tomato soup. I thought the root vegetable in the center front might be rutabagas, or maybe a mixture of turnips and rutabagas. I can't figure out what is in that flat to the left of the barrel of cranberries. Hazelnuts, perhaps? (I thought of chestnuts, but thought they were bigger.)

 
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