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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SUMMER IN ITALY, 1951

Work Zone: 1920

Work Zone: 1920

Washington, D.C., 1920. "Street scenes, 14th & New York Avenue." National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

From the opposite direction

I, too, work a block away. ctank77 has nailed the site description, so I'll simply add a photo showing the 1923 view from the white skyscraper south toward the Bond Building. (Higher-resolution versions of this image are at the LOC). The Willard Hotel is visible at left.

More change than just road repair methods

The cameraman is pointed north in the middle of 14th St just south of New York Ave. The only buildings that remain are the Bond Building (1901) on the far left and 801 14th St NW (1914), which is the 12 story building in the distance on the right that was one of Washington's first classic old skyscrapers. I work about a block from this intersection and frequent a Potbelly Sandwich Works located in the Bond Building on this corner and the "skyscraper" has a beautiful green, gold, and white terra cotta facade. And of course there's a Cosi on the ground floor now. In 1979 a developer applied for a permit to demolish the now protected Bond Building but the D.C. Superior Court blocked the demolition in 1980. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. Here's the scene today...


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Look busy, fellows

That dag blang photographer is back.

My, we've come a long way

How can you fix a road without orange and white barrels?

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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