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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • EAT MORE FISH, 1917

Killer B: 1942

Killer B: 1942

July 1942. "Production. B-25 bombers. Mounting a 1700-horsepower Wright Whirlwind engine to the firewall of a B-25 bomber. Fairfax bomber plant, Kansas City." 4x5 Kodachrome transparency by Alfred Palmer. View full size.

 

Man on the chain

Note the classic aviation style overalls, and on his belt, a ring to hold "tool chits," brass tags that were turned in at tool room for specialty tools.

Thems was the daze...

Good view of the de-icing boot

A useful safety innovation from B.F. Goodrich. Developed in the 1920s, these rubber boots on the wing leading edges could be inflated with compressed air to crack off accumulations of ice. Ice on the wings reduces the airfoil efficiency, sometimes to the point that there's insufficient lift to maintain altitude.

Fairfax Airport

in Kansas City Kansas, built 6,608 B-25's and sent 862 to Russia, the 1700hp engines were Wright R-2600-92 and were 14 cylinders in double row.

Caption CX

I'm suremit's in the original caption, but you might note that no B-25 version was powered by the Wright Whirlwind. Virtually all were powered by Wright Twin Cyclones.

That Stopped the Corrosion....

That zinc chromate paint was a necessary factor in keeping the corrosion of aluminum to a minimum.(whew!) Considering the fact that many B-25's ended up in the Pacific theatre, it was a wise choice. Admittedly, it's a great color for the Kodachrome format.

You give us those nice bright colors

Kodachrome remains the photo standard. What a loss!

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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