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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • AUSTRALIA TRAVEL, c. 1930

Chicago Club: 1906

Chicago Club: 1906

Circa 1906. "The Chicago Club, Chicago."A number of spectral pedestrians here. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

Michigan Avenue or Boulevard?

We see here, from left to right, at #:
203 The Fine Arts Building, also known as the Studebaker Building
202 Chicago Musical College
200 Chicago Club
(I wonder if someone can find the 201 entrance?).
Everywhere is mentioned they are located at Michigan Avenue, but under the lemma for Historic Michigan Boulevard District, you may find that prior to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, the street was officially known as Michigan Boulevard and often referred to as "Boul Mich". But in the 1900s Ads of the Chicago Musical College, Michigan Boulevard is still mentioned as the address.
Another puzzle for me is that the College was founded in 1867, but the season numbering in all Ads of the College seem to point at 1865 as the year of establishment (and I have seen them in Ads from 1900 till 1925, the 60th year!). Can anyone explain that?

White Wing

Looks like we have a ghost pic of a White Wing (street cleaner) with his broom in the foreground

Chicago Kindergarten College

To the right of this building on Van Buren Street is a building with a sign that appears to read "Chicago Kindergarten College". That sounded strange, but it turns out to have been a predecessor to today's National Louis University:

https://www.nl.edu/t4/about/history/

Two doors down

Appears to still be there, the building that replaced the original Chicago Club is pretty nice, but not nearly as ornate:


View Larger Map

Head Count

Counting spectral pedestrians, standees, carved faces and drivers I see 25 people and a torso, or so. Hey, it's Chicago!

Intentional?

Has the statue at the very top been drawn and quartered?

Built as the Art Institute of Chicago

This handsome Richardsonian Romanesque building at the southwest corner of Michigan Ave. and Van Buren St. was designed by Burnham and Root and built in 1885-1887 for the Art Institute of Chicago. After the Art Institute moved into its present headquarters two blocks up and across Michigan Avenue in 1893, the building was sold to the Chicago Club. As the story goes, the building collapsed during renovations in 1928 (no reasons given), and the present Chicago Club structure was built to replace it in 1929. This photograph shows some interesting details near the top of the gable that I never noticed before: the portraits of three old time Renaissance artists (Leonardo? Michelangelo?) and the headless, armless, and legless torso atop a pile of artistic objects at the apex of the gable.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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