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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SYPHILIS ... SIX OUT OF TEN CURED, 1941

Owana at Toledo: 1912

Owana at Toledo: 1912

Toledo, Ohio, circa 1912. "Steamer Owana ready to leave for Detroit." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

Cresceus ... A Plaster Horse?

     I was curious about the word "cresceus" on the side of Toledo Supply and thought it might be some sort of plaster but much to my surprise a search led to an amazing horse of that era.

Cresceus
CRESCEUS WITH HIS OWNER GEORGE H. KETCHUM

     Cresceus owed his life to the disobedience of the superintendent. The colt had no more than turned a yearling when he was stricken with a severe attack of distemper. As it had settled in the throat, a heavy blister had been applied to that section. The youngster rubbed off the blister and looked so terrible that Ketcham ordered him destroyed as he thought the animal would be worthless.

The Rest Of The Story.

Sidewheeler Owana

The Owana operated a daily schedule departing Detroit in the morning, and Toledo in afternoon. Launched as the Pennsylvania in 1889 by Detroit Dry Dock Company, Wyandotte, Michigan. Renamed Owana in 1905, Erie in 1925, T. A. Ivey in 1934, a return to Erie in 1964, broken up 1981. Gross tonnage 747, net tonnage 420, length 201 ft., beam 32 ft. Passenger and cargo ferry: the forward part of her main deck could accomodate wagons and automobiles.

Another photo of the Owana, most likely from the same day, at Smoke and Mirrors: 1912.

Other vessels on Shorpy built at same Wyandotte shipyard:

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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