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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • LAKE GARDA, ITALY

Ladies Who Lance: 1930

Ladies Who Lance: 1930

April 16, 1930. "These Washington society girls will compete for fencing title of the District of Columbia at the Mayflower Hotel this week. Left to right: Elizabeth Bunting, judge; Priscilla Holcombe; Maj. Walter E. Blunt, referee; Margaret Montgomery; and Lillian Shuman, judge." Harris & Ewing. View full size.

 

Tourney Prep


Washington Post, March 23, 1930.

13 Fencers Qualify For Tourney Here

Thirteen fencers, eight women and five men, have qualified for the fencing tournament which will be held April 18 and 19 in the Italian garden of the Mayflower Hotel. Entries closed Thursday night and the following were named to compete for the individual championship for the District: Women, Miss Christine Ekengren, Miss Dudley Breckinridge, Miss Marjorie Montgomery, Miss Priscilla Holcombe, Miss Elizabeth Bunting, Miss Mildred English, Miss Adeline Furness, and Miss Francesca Underwood; men, Senor Paul Vianello, Senor Margin Arostegui, Capt. Frank B. Hayne, Lieut. Helmer W. Lystad, and Lieut. T.J. Sands.


Washington Post, May 22, 1931.

Fencing Captain

Miss Priscilla Holcombe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Holcombe, has been elected to membership in the Foil, the women's honorary fencing club of Cornell University, which she is captain of the freshmen's fencing team, according to word received here. Miss Holcombe is well known in local fencing circles, having captained the senior fencing team at Holton-Arms, where she was graduated last year.

Is Margaret

Montgomery wearing a nifty pair of Red Ball Jets?

Priscilla Was a Lefty

@bubrahucuze: Nah, Pricilla is a lefty fencer. Note the gloved left hand (and ungloved right hand). Also note her tunic buttons on her right side. If it buttoned on the left, she'd be in danger, literally.

Priscilla's awkward stance is probably due to the optical illusion caused by her being closer to the camera than her "opponent". The camera is not perpendicular to the fencers' plane. Note their feet in relation to the playground pavement gridlines.

I'd say you're right (pun intended) about Margaret being a better fencer, IF Priscilla doesn't hike-up her skirt like Margaret did. Awfully hard to lunge with a below-the-knee skirt binding you up! But seriously, some believe lefty fencers have a slight edge over righty fencers due to the righty/lefty percentage of fencers. Similar to lefty batters having an edge on righty pitchers (supposedly), etc.

The best part

is the kid atop the slide expressing "whatever." The greatest phys-ed class I ever had was fencing in college. I only wish I could afford membership in the Minnesota Sword Club about a mile from home. Anyone for street fencing?

And who do we have here?

Looks like they are getting 'photo bombed' by the young lad at the top of the slide.

Righty fencing lefty?

Looks like they had Priscilla Holcombe switch weapon hands so her face could be seen by the camera. Hence her awkward stance. Either that or Margaret Montgomery is just a way better fencer than Priscilla.

 
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