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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • EAT MORE FISH, 1917

Home Team: 1924

Home Team: 1924

1924. "Washington baseball." The Nationals, a.k.a. the Senators, at Griffith Stadium. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

More on Nick Altrock

Nick Altrock is remembered in baseball for his rubber-faced comic antics and his heyday as a lefty pitcher might have been brief, but he won 62 games for the Chicago White Sox from 1904-06. In '06, he pitched twice in the Sox' World Series win over the crosstown Cubs. He beat Cubs' legend Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown in the first game 2-1 and lost the rematch, 1-0. Had an earned-run average of 1.00 for the series.

(The Wikipedia entry to which HistoryLover refers has a picture of police escorting Altrock through a mob of fans after an '06 World Series game at the Cubs' West Side Grounds. Finding Nick in the shot is like trying to find Waldo in one of those kids' books.)

Altrock wasn't especially big (5'10") and was not a power pitcher, according to historians, who describe him as being a superb fielder of his position and having a devastating pickoff move. If he relied on breaking pitches, my guess is that's what did in his arm.

Aberration

The Washington entry in major league baseball was often noted to be "First in war, first in peace, and last in the American League." 1924 was one the of the few years when that didn't apply. Walter Johnson, whose best years were behind him, still managed to go 23-7 at the age of 37. Greatest Pitcher Ever.

His name is Nick

Second row, far right: Thank you Wikapedia: Nicholas "Nick" Altrock (September 15, 1876 – January 20, 1965) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. Though his days as a full-time player ended quickly due to injury, Altrock made periodic appearances as a pinch hitter for many years. He appeared in a game at the age of 57. He was a coach for Washington for many years.

A couple more IDs

Top row, third on the left: Roger Peckinpaugh
Top row, fourth on the left: Sam Rice - Hall of Famer
Middle row, second on the left: Joe Judge
Middle row, third on the left: Muddy Ruel
Bottom row, all the way to the right: Goose Goslin - Hall of Famer

BTW: Bucky Harris and Walter Johnson are also Hall of Famers.

Two more IDs

To Walter Johnson's left: Bucky Harris, player manager of this World Championship team.

All the way on the right of the second row: Nick Altrock - he was a "coach" and was a between-innings clown at home games.

First row, last on our right

Goose Goslin

Second Row

Far right, he looks like he would be glad to get in trouble and take you along. Can anyone come up with more names?

World Series

This is the year the team went to the World Series and won, beating the New York Giants.

He must've been good

Everybody's got Walter's initial on their caps and uniforms.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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