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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CARNAVAL EN LA HABANA, 1941

Acme Market: 1948

Acme Market: 1948

Maryland circa 1948. "Acme Market. Four Corners -- Woodmoor Shopping Center, Colesville Pike and Old Bladensburg Road. Schreier & Patterson, architects." Safety negative by Theodor Horydczak. View full size.

 

Active Acme's

Maybe the chain is not as widespread as before, but there are two within my area, one as a super-store with all the vitality of any GIANT or SAFEWAY. Excellent pricing as well.

Supplier to Wile E. Coyote

The Acme is still around. But: while once ubiquitous in at least the NJ-PA area, the Acme chain is now in decline.

More Woodmoor

Right here.

Acme Market

Where Wile E. Coyote did his shopping for some of those specialty items - must have been "unadvertised specials".

I Agree

I agree with oldcarguy and I stand corrected. The Plymouth is a '42, the fenders on the 1940 had stamped in ribs and the bumpers were slimmer.

Maybe Even Newer

The Plymouth, I believe, may be a '42, since it looks very similar to the '42 Dodge that appeared in the gas station photos a few days ago. The '40 Plymouth had vertical tail lights, as did the '41. The rear lights on the car pictured first appeared in 1942 and remained pretty much the same up to the introduction of the restyled cars in mid 1949. That would mean the owner really didn't waste much time beating the heck out of it!

In my mind

I can smell this place. A welcoming, comforting, mixed-food smell that no modern store has.

On second thought

J.W. Wright, I think you're right.

Sweeter Than a Beater

It is interesting to compare the 40 Chevy to the 40 Plymouth. Both are the same age, yet the Chevy has been lovingly cared for, while the poor old Mayflower has been beaten to within an inch of its life. Filthy, hubcaps missing, repainted with a brush or a Flit sprayer. Just sad to look at.

The 1940 Plymouth

Has had a much harder life in its eight years than its Chevrolet contemporary on the far left, still wearing shiny paint and looking in pristine condition. The Plymy by contrast has lost its hubcaps, probably on both sides, had its trunk lid and fender dented, rust starting to show through, maybe left rear window broken. The owner may live in the sticks seeing all the mud on it.

Actually this building looks more like it

Note the windows and door placement:


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Family Sedans

From left to right the cars are: 1940 Chevrolet, 1948 Pontiac, 1940 Plymouth, 1946 Chevrolet Fleetline, 1948 Ford, 1937 Ford.

It's still there

Although remodeled on the front and extended, it's still there, at Colesville Road and University Blvd West, in Silver Spring. The key is the brick pattern of every third course recessed, and the cornice along the top.


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