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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • NORTH TUSCANY COAST, 1948

On the Ground: 1905

On the Ground: 1905

New Zealand circa 1905. "Unidentified group having a picnic outside tent in backyard of house, probably Christchurch district." Are New Zealanders the most picnicking people on the planet? Glass negative by Adam Maclay. View full size.

 

Maybe generational?

As transplanted midwesterners, both my grandparents and parents were constant and usually very well-dressed picnickers once they moved to sunny southern California. By the time my brother and I were adults we had been on enough picnics to last our entire remaining lives, and rarely go on them without substantial family pressure.

2nd from the right

Either the photo has a boo boo or he's got food stuck in his mustache.

Not effortless

And it's done in suits and dresses without the benefit of Tupperware.

New Zealand Picnickers

Are New Zealanders the most picnicking people on the planet? Maybe yes maybe no, but they probably were the best dressed.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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