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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CARNIVAL OF THE ARTS, 1937

Fast Food: 1943

Fast Food: 1943

March 1943. "Conductor George E. Burton, having lunch in the caboose on the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe between Chicago and Chillicothe." Medium-format negative by Jack Delano for the Office of War Information. View full size.

 

A Legend in Headgear

He is wearing a cap called a Stormy Kromer. In 1903 railroad engineer Stormy Kromer was fed up with losing his ball cap every time he stuck his head out the train window. His wife Ida devised a set of ear flaps that could be cinched snug around Stormy's noggin thereby keeping his hat in place. A legend was born.

The hat became a favorite with other railroad men and with hunters, lumbermen and all manner of outdoorsy types.

About 10 years ago, the hat manufacturer was calling it quits when a young guy from Ironwood, Michigan bought the patterns and started making the classic Stormy. They now make vests, pants, coats and all manner of clothing for anyone who prefers to stay warm when it is cold.

Safety First

Around many rail lines, it's common to see the slogan "Safety First". Example: use safety pins to affix your badge to your hat.

Price of a loaf of bread

Was 8 cents in those days and milk about 25 cents a gallon. My mother would send me to the store with my little red wagon. I think I remember the bread wrapped in printed waxed paper rather than the clear shown here.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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