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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • STAY ONE JUMP AHEAD OF TROUBLE, 1945

Lobby S: 1957

Lobby S: 1957

August 13, 1957. "Tamarack Lodge, Greenfield Park, New York. General view of lobby." Large-format acetate negative by Gottscho-Schleisner. View full size.

 

I'm just a borscht in a cage

Love the bird cages! I only have the vaguest of memories of Tamarack Lodge. My wife may remember better as her family went there often. We went to Grossinger's mostly.

A Borscht Belt Classic

Besides the pools, activities, horseback riding, hiking and golf, the Tamarack boasted entertainment such as Danny Kaye, Jerry Lewis, Cream, Janis Joplin and The Who. It was ultimately destroyed by a series of fires, the last one in April 2012, but had long before been closed up and abandoned. There is a wonderful collection of the (pre-fire) derelict property on Flickr.

Clearly a fake

This photo must be a modern recreation: there are NO ASHTRAYS. Or would they have removed them for the photo?

[I see at least seven. -tterrace]

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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