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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE TOY DEPARTMENT, 1913

Frigidaire: 1951

Frigidaire: 1951

June 1, 1951. "Raymond Loewy Associates, 'Look' kitchen." Which evidently had something to do with Look magazine. Oven-range and refrigerator by Frigidaire. Large-format acetate negative by Gottscho-Schleisner. View full size.

 

Metal Cabinets

In principle a good idea, but my memory of them is of sharp edges waiting for the unwary hand. And they always seemed to be just a little flimsy, with rust spots in odd corners.

Father Knew Best

The second I laid eyes on this picture I was looking for Margaret Anderson to walk in the room. When I was young those metal cabinets were fairly common in rental homes and they always looked like they had been through a war. And lost.

Generic expression

Grandma referred to all 'electric ice boxes' as Frigidaires. I thought it was French for refrigerator.

Not WearEver, either

After some Googling failed, some Binging matched those pots on the wall. They're Ekcoware.

[I think you're right. -tterrace]

Not Revere Ware

The copper-clad pots and pans are not Revere Ware. The Revere Ware logo of the 50s was round. Also, the handles were made of two pieces of bakelite-type stuff, very smoothly rounded, with two bolts that passed through to hold them together on a flat tab of metal welded to the pan body.

I've been using my mom's original Revere Ware for 40 years, keeping those copper bottoms bright as a new penny. Mom knew I would,while she would not, and that's why she gave them to me. When she and Dad married in 1951, they'd been married about two weeks when my dad said, "Maybe we should buy some dishes?" "What for?", Mom replied, "We can just eat out." She had a point, but I have the pots and pans and a set of Melamac dishes to show who won that argument. (But maybe mom's "memory of an elephant" had something to do with her giving them to the first kid to leave home to make a final point.)

No More Doth The Ice Man Cometh

If indeed that refer sold for anyway near $235 it was was probably nearly 2 months pay for an average working man. When I entered the business in 1954 a 10 cu ft 1 door, you defrost it refrigerator would kick off the advertising season at $99 which netted the dealer not quite $15 before delivery.

Retro lovers

Having just read an article in a remodeling magazine regarding mid-twentieth-century restorations, it said that it is now possible to get retro-looking appliances by several different manufacturers and in several new bright colors to boot if that is your wish. They showed a red range hood, orange stove, pink fridge, etc. etc. Also a note to su dee: if you are interested in Jubilee kitchen wax (I remember it well) it is in some Walmart stores and available on line at walmart.com. Even though it was discontinued, apparently they have resumed making limited quantities for ardent fans of the product.

Revere Wear

Love the Revere Wear pans hanging above the stove!

Familiar

I grew up with a kitchen that looked about like this. It was my job to shine the cabinets with Jubilee.

Celebrity Designer

In 1951 Raymond Loewy was enjoying the height of his status as a popularizer of Modernist streamlined industrial designs. His autobiography, "Never Leave Well Enough Alone," and his design textbook, "Industrial Design," were both selling briskly, and his company's projects were seen in every category of American consumer products. Beginning in 1950, Frigidaire gave him top billing in their marketing campaigns, as seen in this typical department store ad: "New styling inside and out, and done by a master."

Attractive then, attractive now

I love the "Look" kitchen! My house was built in 1950 and has its original white metal kitchen cabinets (plus a 1947 GE refrigerator that I bought 20+ years ago). There's 9" Kentile asbestos tile under the current flooring, and my goal is to cover it with modern linoleum tile that looks like the original.

Enamel Metal...

My parents first home was a new build in the south Chicago suburbs in 1952 featuring this identical white enamel kitchen cabinetry - right down to the round clear plastic knobs.

We must be getting old

Especially since I see on an "Old" Shorpy photo of a set of kitchen utensils we still use on a daily basis. They are stainless steel and each piece has "Maid of Honor" on the handles. Um, maybe that is why they were wedding presents, so many years ago.

Asbestos Floor Tiles

When I was a kid, it seems like everyone's house had asbestos floor tiles like those in the photo; ours were in the basement & "rec room". (Everyone had a rec room, too.) Tearing them out will cost a fortune - the best thing to do is cover them up with something more attractive.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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