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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CHRISTMAS PRINTS

Christmas P.J.'s: 1951

Christmas P.J.'s: 1951

"Christmas P.J.'s -- Dec. 25 1951." Grace and Sally clash in the latest episode of Minnesota Kodachromes! 35mm color slide by Hubert Tuttle. View full size.

On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Antimacassars

Apropos of which, I am reminded of a limerick from a long-ago New Yorker:

A voluptuous virgin at Vassar
Is knitting an antimacassar,
To induce her professor
to love and caress her,
And possibly even to pass her.

Crocheted doilies

You don't see crocheted doilies on chairs these days. I wonder if they were handmade?

[Those are called antimacassars and yes, they were hand-made, usually by your mother or grandmother. -tterrace]

Kodachrome mailer

I believe there is a 20-exposure box of processed Kodachromes on the table along with the cigars. The yellow box looks to be the right color and shape.

A dog and cigars

Just imagining coming home from work and sitting here reading the evening newspaper.

The PJs of Saint Mary's

Those are the same pajamas she was wearing at the hospital.

Rifle, curtain rod, or something else?

What's that propped against the entry door frame, behind the chair? Perhaps a Red Ryder carbine action, two-hundred shot range model air rifle?

On the contrary

Sally's collar matches Grace's pajamas beautifully. They are even color-coordinated with the drapes and lamp. The poor, pale, porcelain cat ...

I wonder what her dress says

My reading and writing of Japanese has been limited to nothing more than handwriting an invitation for dinner to one Japanese president, with assistance from a Japanese native. At least my writing was good enough that he actually showed up. A little might have been lost in the communication, though, as the first question he asked when I opened the limo door was if I'd gotten him a call girl and here I'd thought $25,000 worth of sushi around the Christmas tree was all I'd promised.

I'd be curious what it says in the print. Seems unusual at that time in America with Pearl Harbor a not very distant memory that a Midwestern woman would wear such a pattern. My father never bought a Japanese car and apologized profusely to his last days for finally buying a Sony TV.

Actually, it makes me wonder if she may have been the wife of an occupying soldier.

London Past & Present

Thank you for the Beautiful Christmas Focus!

I thought Shorpy might appreciate seeing this:
"Christmas in London past and present: In pictures."

Happy Holidays to You and Yours!
Patty

You'll put your eye out!

That looks like the barrel of a Daisy BB Gun sticking up behind the chair.

Behind the chair

Is that Ralphie's Red Ryder 200-Shot Range Model Air Rifle?

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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