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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

Garden of Grace: 1951

Garden of Grace: 1951

"Grace's flowers -- 18 Sept 1951." In this latest episode of Minnesota Koda­chromes the outlook is, regardless of the weather, Sunny and Warm. Color slide by Hubert Tuttle of his lovely wife and her beautiful flowers. View full size.

On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Reminds one of home

This reminds me of my grandmother's flower garden just like this one (only they were roses and pansies). I remember as a boy visiting and walking through a climbing rose trellis along the garden path. Thanks Dave for this wonderful family

♥♥♥♥

I love Grace, her life seems so happy ...

I see Sally

Hiding in the flowers!

Screens and storms

Every year, spring and fall, my dad and granddad took a day to put up the screens in the summer and another for the storm windows in the fall. All the windows had to be washed before they were hung. They were stored in the basement all summer (and the storms were there all winter). It was quite a production on our Queen Anne house. I am sure Hubert did the same. I admire their bright red screens (and door). Ours were black. This is a lovely picture, and the colors of Grace's flowers complement the house beautifully.

Poppies?

What kind of flowers are those??

[Zinnias, petunias, daisies. - Dave]

Oooh! I want to be here!

I'm just a couple of hours and a few seasons from this location and I'm tired of winter already.

I notice the windows and remember my first house that had removable screens and storms. Unlike my combination windows, full screens allowed better ventilation by allowing you to open the top sash of the double-hung window, cooling the room by convection.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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