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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CHRISTMAS PRINTS

B.S. on Bull Street: 1907

B.S. on Bull Street: 1907

Georgia circa 1907. "National Bank of Savannah, Bull Street." Completed 1905; demolished 1975. 8x10 inch glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Bank of Savannah

Is that automobile fluids on the street or residual blood stains from a gangland massacre?

[I'd say it was water. -tterrace]

Sidewalk Skylights

Many of those skylights (from buildings that weren't torn down) still exist on Broughton Street; in fact I stepped on some today when I went to pick up lunch!

Glass skylights

In the 1960's, these still were being used in NYC. I remember how pretty they looked on the sidewalks.

H. W. Witcover Architect

The windows of the top floor offices are lettered for "H. W. Witcover Architect," the designer of this and many other significant Savannah buildings of the turn of the century. Hyman Wallace Witcover's (1871-1936) surviving Savannah structures include the Savannah City Hall (1906) at the head of Bull Street, the Scottish Rite Temple (1913) facing Madison Square, and the Bnai Brith Jacob Synagogue at 120 Montgomery Street (1909, now the Savannah College of Art and Design Student Center). Witcover designed the bank building shown here, also known as the Liberty Bank and Trust Building, as well as the slightly shorter one behind it, the Germania Bank Building (aka the Blun Building), which opened in 1904 and was reputed to be Savannah's first skyscraper.

Wow!

Such a gorgeous building - one of my favorites here on Shorpy!

LOVE that front entrance.

One question: what are the grates in the sidewalk covering in front of each archway?

[They're not grates, but sidewalk skylights over basements. One of those favorite things to spot in Shorpy streetscapes. -tterrace]

Non Disputatum

They decided this was a better idea:

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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