SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 

 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2017 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

Firing Squad: 1925

Firing Squad: 1925

May 29, 1925. "Central High Rifle Team." Rumor has it these girls are loaded. National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Comments

To Bill Landau - for right-handed shooters, the bolt is on the right. The left hand supports the rifle while being loaded, then the finger returned to the trigger area and the rifle repositioned at the shoulder.

My High School Jr. ROTC had a shooting range in the basement. I was somewhat surprised, but pleased, to learn from a current student that the range is still in operation, and the Rifle Team is doing well.

Not Now

In 1965 I was a member of a Junior ROTC Rifle Team in Detroit, MI. Each Monday my twin brother would pack up his Winchester model 52B and I would pack up my Winchester model 75 and take them with us on the PUBLIC (not school) bus to our high school in downtown Detroit. Our rifles went immediately to the ROTC armory/rifle range and locked up. On Friday we made the trip home on the bus with our rifles.

Will never happen again.

Not on the left

It does not look like the bolt is on the left for either of those rifles. On the left side rifle that is not the bolt handle it is the safety. On the right side the bolt is missing but you can see the cutout where the handle would go.
As a side note in light of todays fear of guns. A friend of mine (now 55) took his rifle to class when he was in Jr High and High School so he could go hunting after school. He just leaned it against the wall in the corner.

Righty wrongy

Traditionally, normal right-handed people shot bolt action rifles with the handles on the right.

Left-handed bolt handles are for left handed people:
http://www.ruger.com/search/group/?cat=left

Rifle Club Transportation

Our HS had a rifle team and rifle club. On days when a rifle was needed, kids on the school bus would carry guns in and later take them home.

The good shots were on the team.

Mistaken identity

I think people are mistaking the safety tab for the bolt charging handle on the rifle on the left. Both rifles are for right handed shooters.

Re: The Good Old Days

I was thinking the same thing. We also had a rifle team, and an after school trap shooting club as well. On the days we shot, everyone brought their shotguns and shells with them to school and left then in their lockers. After school we'd all go down behind the football field and shoot until dark. What a difference 40 years makes.

Bolt on the left

The bolt should be on the left. A righty would have her right index finder on the trigger, work the bolt with her left hand.

The Good Old Days

I can't imagine that happening today, people are so uptight about firearms these days. Todays youths and adults for that matter are scared to death at the site of firearms.

[Not to mention the sight of them. -Dave]

The good old days.

We also had a rifle team in my H.S. also back in 1960. Imagine trying to get one started today.

The Bolts

I have one of those model 52's. The bolt has been removed from the rifle held by the young lady to the right. The safety for the rifle on the left is engaged.

Missing Bolt

No wonder the girl on the right looks unhappy. Someone removed the bolt from her rifle. Maybe she threatened the photographer?

Proper gear

Love the necklaces.

Straight Shooters

These young ladies appear to be holding a nice pair of Winchester Model 52's. The Model 52 was the "go to" rifle for competitive rimfire shooters for many years.

Posh Arms

Guns are early Winchester Model 52s. First class target rifles.

Spicoli's Van

Looks like the upper middle and right side just got out of it.

A Pair of 52's

Looks like they are holding a pair of Winchester Model 52 target rifles. The Model 52 was and still is a highly sought after rifle.

Lefties?

Either those are special rifles for left-handed folk, or the picture is backwards. The bolt appears to be on the left side of the rifles.

[Which shoulder are their recoil pads on? - Dave]

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2017 Shorpy Inc.