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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • BRITISH COLUMBIA, c. 1947

Officers' Quarters: 1907

Officers' Quarters: 1907

1907. "Officers' quarters. Fort Thomas, Kentucky." At left, the residence of Lt. Col. Leonard Austin Lovering. 8x10 inch glass negative. View full size.

 

Hydrophilic Wisteria

They wreck havoc on sprinklers, septic systems, and drain pipes as well.

Current status

From Fort Wiki:

"The officer quarters on Greene Street were privatized and sold to individuals in 1992, creating an upscale "Military Commons". These homes have been modernized internally with the exteriors kept keeping their 1890s look. The officer quarters on Alexander Circle remain unoccupied and deteriorating."

Civil War Forts

Ft. Thomas, Ft. Wright and Ft. Mitchell all in Kentucky, are now quiet northern Kentucky suburbs of Cincinnati. During the Civil War however, they were heavily armed camps who's only mission was the protection of the city of Cincinnati from Confederate invasion. It must have convinced the Southern tacticians, as Cincinnati was ultimately never threatened.

Slithering Vines

they be Wisteria which have beautiful light purplish flowers, but play havoc with trellises and brickwork.

First Step

What is that thing?

[Boot scraper. -tterrace]

This picture brings back memories.

During my last assignment on active duty we lived in one of the old, historically-designated houses for senior officers at the Presidio of Monterey, CA. It was like living in a piece of history. Very quiet, very pleasant. You knew all your neighbors. In 1907 Lt. Col. Levering, being the post commander, would also have known all his neighbors, and in the "Old Army", there would have been a number of social functions at the residence.

Anyone care to

describe those tree-like plants slithering up the side of the buildings?

[Wisteria. -tterrace]

Still Standing

The Lt. Col's house was part of a military compound and the surviving buildings on this road (9 Green Street) match those in the historical photo.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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