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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

Fellow Travelers: 1899

Fellow Travelers: 1899

Circa 1899. "R.R. depot at Garrison, New York." En route to their final destination. 8x10 glass negative, Detroit Photographic Company. View full size.

 
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B is for Buffalo

The "B 390" stands for Buffalo, NY, not Boston. The New York Central did eventually reach Boston, but via a subsidiary railroad called the Boston and Albany (which it didn't assume control of until a year after this photo was taken). Milepost measurements are from NYC to Buffalo and eventually Chicago (when you include their Michigan Southern subsidiary).

Today Garrison itself still has a rural feel to it, but this station building is long gone, replaced by modern high-level concrete platforms.

Chair legs

I'd venture a guess that the fellow second from right is the telegraph operator, due to the fact the chair he is sitting in has glass telegraph insulators on the front legs.

I have heard of rangers on watch duty in forest fire towers and telegraph operators doing that in case of a lighning strike, but they would put them on all four, not just the front ones.

Revolutionary

New York City 50 miles this-a-way (south), and Boston 390 miles that-a-way (northeast).

BTW, called Garrison, because General Washington garrisoned his troops there as a blocking force to protect control of the Hudson River while the British occupied 50 miles this-a-way (south) aka NYC. If the British got control of the Hudson, they would have had a wedge between New England and the remainder of the 13 colonies.

New York Central Railroad

Being that Garrison Station is now Metro North RR today this means it is a very good probability that at the time of the photograph this was a New York Central Railroad Station.

Hello Dolly

The Garrison train station is used as the set (standing in for Yonkers) in the movie Hello Dolly. Lots of information if you scroll down to "Garrison New York Location" here.

Bolivia Bound

Butch Cassidy leans nonchalantly agains the window sill while Sundance assumes an agressive stance to his left. Their traveling companion, Etta Place, has just went inside to buy their tickets.

Dressed up

Granted that people dressed up to go anywhere in those days, but the level of best-of-the-Sunday-best sort of suggests a trip to NYC itself.

Insulated leg extensions

It looks like the young man sitting on the left has his chair propped up on some telegraph pole insulators. I would imagine they have a few boxes stored there.

Beautiful location

The Metro-North Hudson line runs along the Hudson River up to Poughkeepsie. A truly beautiful train ride around sunset.

 
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