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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

Suburban Buick: 1957

Suburban Buick: 1957

A 1957 Buick, houses in colors not seen anymore, and lots of antennas. A 35mm Kodachrome slide I found somewhere. View full size.

On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Tim Burton's inspiration

This scene looks like it's right out of Edward Scissorhands.

House Colors

Sorry, but if you think houses aren't painted sherbet pink and green anymore, you haven't been to San Francisco.

Those old style antennas

It's interesting to see the old stacked conical and dipole rooftop TV antennas, instead of the later horizontal log-periodic ones. And I like the wood on the garage door, and the front of the house near the front door. Redwood?

The Buick looks like a Special two-door hardtop, and the colors look like Shell Beige (Code P) over Dover White (Code C). Hat tip: Paintref.com.

Gold Plated

I don't think it's California. The plates are red on yellow. Could be New Mexico? Great find.

[The red fringing is a scanning artifact. The plates are black on yellow. -tterrace]

Little Pink Houses

... and Buicks, for you and me.

I was 15

And I could name any car from any distance.

Looks Like CA

The lack of gutters and the orange license plate looks like CA (Black plates were introduced around 1963.) Considering GM's marketing strategy of moving from Chevrolet to Pontiac to Oldsmobile and ultimately to Cadillac, this house looks too modest for a Buick driver. Maybe the landlord has stopped by to collect the rent.

A Buick Family

It's like the '54 we had when I was 6. We drove it across country from Baltimore in 1957 to our new home in California. Later traded it in on a 1960 Olds wagon.

http://www.1960oldsmobile.com/wp-content/gallery/featured-member-jason-n...

Both great cars for a kid to bounce around in!

Beautiful Three toned Buick

Car color matches the house yet. Unbelievable.

Match

The top of the car and the house

TV forecast: snow 24/7

Nothing to miss about the reception from those antennas.

Conical antennas

Look like Florida houses. Those are conical TV antennas. Low gain, wide band inexpensive antennas very popular in the '50s before UHF stations became common. As a kid I made money putting those up for neighbors.

Factory Air-Conditioning

is an option on this Special by the presence of the stainless steel outlets in the middle of the dash pad--also new was an enlarged 364 V-8 with a slightly reduced 250 horsepower in this base, but still beautifully trimmed out, model.

All made of ticky-tacky

There's a pink one, and a green one...

New Frontier

I can just hear Donald Fagen's song New Frontier playing when I look at this Kodachrome slide.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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