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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CAMPBELL SOUP KID, c. 1910

Life and Times: 1938

Life and Times: 1938

November 1938. "Omaha, Nebraska, newsstand." Medium format negative by John Vachon for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Two more

Newsstand colorized

As TheGeezer said, this newsstand screams for a "color"-man. Here you will find the result of quite a few hours work.

Screenland

With Bette Davis and Errol Flynn on the cover. Plus (at last): "The REAL truth about Hollywood Stars' Dieting."

New Yorker

The Nov. 12, 1938 issue. Spanning pages 30 and 31 is an amusing cartoon spread documenting various Emotional Crises, including new mother-in-law, a friend in tears, contagious disease, and demonstrative child.

Tracked down another one that's still around.

Fur-Fish-Game is to the left of The New Yorker.

Adventure Comics

I see #32 is on the stand, the first issue under that title. These were published by DC. Superman 6 months earlier on action but his dad Jor-el preceded him by a year in this series #12

Another Survivor

"Astounding Science Fiction" changed its name to "Analog Magazine" back in the '60s and kept right on.

QST

There is another survivor: on the third row near the center, just barely visible is “QST – devoted entirely to amateur radio.”
QST has been published continuously by the American Radio Relay League since 1917.

According to current editor Steve Ford, “QST hasn’t been on newsstands in nearly 20 years, but there was a time when newsstands were one of the most important means of magazine distribution.”

Additional survivor

I am so lowbrow:
Adventure Comics

Edit: Oops! I was wrong listing this as a survivor. According to Wikipedia, the last Adventure Comic was number 529, cover dated September 2010. Too bad.

Short list of survivors

Which of these are still in print?

I count

Time
The Atlantic
Redbook
Catholic Digest
Consumers Digest
Billboard
Readers Digest
The New Yorker

Maybe others???

That must have been someone's joke

A copy of "Better English" in the middle of a solid row of pulp magazines!

One of the Best

No one spotted the Billboard cover with Spanish ventriloquist Señor Wences? He’d have been 42 in 1938. He lived to be 103. There are a flood of Wences videos on YouTube. In the photo his characters of Johnny and Pedro hadn’t completely evolved into what they later looked like.

Won't somebody help that poor girl !?!

10 Complete Stories of True Gang Life !!!!!

Easy, breezy, beautiful....Cover Girl

I'm reading that issue of Life Magazine right now, the one with Brenda Frazier on the cover. My father has a ton of old issues of Life, which he inherited from his mother, and that happened to be the one I grabbed just a couple of hours ago, before I logged in to Shorpy. How fortuitous. Or is it serendipitous?

One thing I cannot make out is who is on the cover of Time. I thought it was J. Edgar Hoover, but 1938 would be too early, I think, for him to be on the cover of any magazines.

[Hoover first appeared on a Time cover on the August 5, 1935 issue. It's Henry Grady Weaver on the November 14, 1938 issue.]

Not Asimov's "I, Robot"

I spotted the January 1939 issue of Amazing Stories which included "I, Robot." The story bears no relation, other than the shared title, to the Isaac Asimov short story collection from which the movie derives.

[Your linked Wikipedia article states "Asimov was heavily influenced by the Binder short story." -tterrace]

LIFE MAGAZINE - Brenda Diana Duff Frazier

She was an American socialite popular during the Depression era. Her December 1938 debutante ball was so heavily publicized worldwide, she eventually appeared on the cover of LIFE magzine for that reason alone. She was known and dubbed as a "Poor Little Rich Girl" by the media, together with socialites and other famous debutantes Barbara Hutton, Gloria Vanderbilt and Doris Duke. There is a Wikipedia article on her.

You Devil

That is a temptation to some talented, artistic individual to colorize it. You devil!

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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