SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
 
The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

  
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content

Join our mailing list (enter email):


 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2018 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CLASSIC CHRISTMAS ART

Boylston in Boston: 1910

Boylston in Boston: 1910

Boston circa 1910. "Boylston Street." The place to go for corsets and riding habits. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5
..

Lady in the foreground

That's some bad hat, Harriet!

Railing Against Progress

The buildings may all have fallen to progress, but the beautiful iron fence remains!

Seemingly also for hats

There is rather a fine selection on display here, not least the one on the elegantly dressed lady in the right foreground.

Arlington Street Church (1861)

in the background was the first church built in Back Bay (which was literally a bay until filled in the mid-19th century).

Lift yourselves up, ladies

And there at #264 are the offices of the Women's Educational and Industrial Union [qv], one of the early efforts to assist under-privileged women and children in Boston. The Union lasted from 1877 to 2006, when it merged with Crittenton, Inc. to form Crittenton Women's Union, continuing the organization's mission.

Boston Common at Twilight

Nearly matches the famous painting of 1885, my favorite at the MFA:

A warm day

... judging by the many opened windows and both ladies and gents in their shirtsleeves.

I don't believe any of the buildings on the left still exist - this appears to be the block of Boylston across from the Public Garden, between Charles and Arlington streets. (The trolley is turning left onto Arlington, in front of the Arlington Street Church.) There are now some rather nondescript modern brick buildings along this block. The Women's Educational and Industrial Union, which only closed in the last 10 years or so, was one block farther west on Boylston in the years that I knew of it.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2018 Shorpy Inc.
sphere