The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • EAT MORE FISH, 1917

Cal and Liz: 1927

Cal and Liz: 1927

April 28, 1927. "Tiny tot gives President Coolidge flood relief contribution. Little Elizabeth Anne Stitt, daughter of Theodore Stitt, Commander-in-Chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, presents Mr. Coolidge with the first 'buddy' poppy of the season." View full size. National Photo Company Collection.

 

Cal and the Kid

But she certainly looks more uncomfortable - either that or she's about to have "an accident."

Silent Cal

Could he look any more uncomfortable holding that little girl?

[As it turns out, yes, he could. - Dave]

The Great Flood of 1927

In the spring of 1927 the Mississippi overflowed its levees, flooding over 27,000 square miles in the most destructive flood in American history, far worse than the Katrina Hurricane. The "Buddy Poppy" was a remembrance of the casualties from WWl that was a charitable effort on behalf of the Veterans of Foreign Wars to "honor the dead by helping the living."

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2014 Shorpy Inc.