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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS, c. 1918

Two Forks: 1939

Two Forks: 1939

October 1939. "Hay forks. Northern Oregon farm. Morrow County, Oregon." View full size. Medium-format nitrate negative by Dorothea Lange for the FSA.

 

Tools of the Devil

Mmong the many derogatory names we had for the implements of torture forced upon us on a beautiful summers afternoon, we also referred to these as 'Witch' forks. Pitching hay in a hot barn on a 90 degree day was only marginally better than stacking bales in the loft. You knew it had to be done, but still pined for that cool riverbank and a willow pole to fish with.

American made

I'm willing to bet those pitchforks are made in the good old U.S. of A.

Very Arty!

Look at how the rectangular frame at the upper right actually echoes the angle of the far left hay fork shadow...and if you removed that arrow shaped door "latch" on the door frame, the whole composition would change.

True Love

Ah, how sweet. Looks like true love.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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