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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SYPHILIS ... SIX OUT OF TEN CURED, 1941

Washington Maytag: 1926

Washington Maytag: 1926

Washington, D.C., 1926. "Maytag Co. display at Industrial Exposition." 8x10 glass negative, National Photo Company Collection. View full size.

 

A word you don't hear every day

"Gyrafoam."

Worked Great!

My best friend's mom had one of these, and it was running great in the 1960s! I think I would like one of these better than the ones today. They had a huge tub, the agitator was a monster, and the wringers worked perfectly.

The best part though, is the tub was higher, and you didn't have to dig down into it, to get to the clothes. The tub was also very wide, and held a LOT of clothes. Her machine had the drain that went into the sink too, so it may not have been exactly like these, but pretty close for sure.

We had to do the wash for all the kids if we wanted to go to the local drive in Mighty Mo and watch the cars pass by about a hundred times, it was a weekend MUST do.

I had not thought of that in years!

Any 1926 Maytags in your possession?

If anyone still has a working Maytag like the ones pictured above please contact me as soon as possible. I'm interested to know how you use it? (jtrejo@peppercom.com)

Thank you!

T-ruck

The car is a 1926 Model T Roadster pickup. It's probably painted the blue/grey color of the Maytag washers. Model T's were offered in colors from 1909 to 1913, "black only" from 1914 to 1925, then colors were again offered in 1926 & 1927. The odd thing about this car is that it has an aftermarket pickup box, not the one that Ford offered.

Maytag Washer

I just recently had a chance to buy a complete working Maytag just like this one for $75. I didn't have the cash on me at the time though.

Maytag Automobile

Since Fred and August Duesenberg were building cars for Maytag, is this a Maytag car on this picture?

Model T

This could be a 1925 or 26 Model T Ford Roadster pickup.
This was probably repainted from the factory black by the Maytag people. Staring in 1928 Ford would paint the truck line to any color the customer wanted for their fleet use.

Arm in the wringer

I am glad to hear that I was not the only one to put his arm through the wringer. I was fortunate that I didn't break my arm, but my mother broke the wringer getting my arm free. I still have a scar on my right biceps to remind me of the incident.

Through the Wringer

My Mom used a wringer well into the fifties. My little brother put his hand through the wringer once and broke his arm. He got so much attention (rare in my six kid family), I tried to do the same. Got mocked and slapped as I didn't have the commitment necessary to complete the task. Best part of this photo is the car though, rather have that than clean clothes.

More NuGrape

Dave, the product placement in this site has gotten pretty shameless.

Now, never mind the electric sign - that "thoroughbred" poster is glorious. So very bold, so timeless and certain. Dave, could you provide a close up, please? I promise to buy a case of NuGrape next time the truck comes by.

[Mmmkay. - Dave]

That reminds me....

...I need to do the laundry. *sigh*

Industrial Exposition

More images from this exposition, please! The company next to the Maytag display is advertising "we resilver mirrors" and they've got some pretty art nouveau examples on display. The NuGrape sign is nice, too. Somebody's offering free Park and Tilford candy with each membership to...something. And exactly HOW do car owners save money on gas, oil, repairs and accessories? This photo is giving me sensory overload!

Maytag in My Living Room

What I wouldn’t give to find one of those electric Maytag signs some day. That would look swell in my living room. Beautiful.

Gasoline Maytag

Hey, I have one of those gas powered Maytag washers sitting on my carport. Single cylinder Model 92 engine plus I have a Maytag twin cylinder engine, but no washer to go with it.

Maytag and Me

My great aunt Beullah lived in an apartment house in Tulsa in the late '40s and kept her Maytag in the basement garage. There was a drain in the middle of the garage and after helping her wring out the clothes I got to hold the hose over the drain to let the water out.

Ringers

I remember my grandmother still had a ringer washer in the 1950s. I wondered why my mom's Bendix didn't have one of those neat roller things. My mom was probably glad her's didn't since I was much too interested in that finger smashing contraption.

[Unless there's a built-in telephone, they're called wringer washers. Not "ringer." - Dave]

Yes, I spotted that as soon as I saw it posted. Guess my thinker wasn't fully in gear. It's getting pretty old too. :-(

Gasoline driven

I remember seeing a number of these with a kickstart gasoline engine still running in the 40's

Modern

I bet those Maytags made the housewives swoon!!! The latest in 1926 technology. Love these pictures and this site - keep 'em coming! Thanks for the history lessons.

 
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