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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • NORTH TUSCANY COAST, 1948

Sisler, Ruth, Cobb: 1924

Sisler, Ruth, Cobb: 1924

October 4, 1924. "Sisler, Ruth, Cobb." George Sisler, Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb at the first game of the 1924 World Series at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Ahead of his time

Cobb is supposed to be only 36 here - he looks much much older. Curious.

[Ty is 37 in this photo, about to turn 38. - Dave]

Gorgeous George

George Sisler was so good it was flat ridiculous. He didn't have Ruth's power (no one ever has) but he had some, and Cobb's knack for average.

Then, about a year prior to this picture, he developed a sinus infection for the ages. Today, with antibiotics, he'd be fine. Back then, he wasn't fine.

It didn't end his career but the double-vision and permanent damage he suffered greatly curtailed his greatness to the point he eventually became just very good as opposed to legendarily great. His sons also played some effective big league ball. He was much greater than history has let on.

Great photo. George Sisler belongs with those two, although not in temperament. Cobb was a prick, Ruth was a blowhard, and Sisler was a kind gentleman to the end of his days.

Your thoughts, Ty?

"He ran okay for a fat man."
- Ty Cobb on Babe Ruth

God, I love this site!

Mystery Man

I guess the guy in the first row, behind Sisler and Ruth, is hiding his face with his hat, because he should have been at the office. Little did he know he'd be out of focus.

Your thoughts, Babe?

"Ty Cobb is a prick. But he sure can hit. God Almighty, that man can hit."
- Babe Ruth

"Mitting" by the Dugout

A paragraph from a long article in the following day's Washington Post:

In the upper grandstand were all the noted characters of sportland. James J. Corbett was hunting all over the place for his seat. Babe Ruth, whose mighty clout failed to bring home the bacon for the Yankees, was only an innocent bystander, while Tyrus Raymond Cobb, who had just finished a hunting trip in Virginia, finally parked himself near the newspaper men's seat. Previously he and the Bambino had been down in the Giants' and Nationals' dugouts "mitting" all the players and extending best wishes.

Lapel Buttons

Could you blow up the buttons on Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb's lapels? I'm curious what's on them. Thanks.

 
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