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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CARNAVAL EN LA HABANA, 1941

Pie Town Dugout: 1940

Pie Town Dugout: 1940

October 1940. "Mr. Leatherman, homesteader, coming out of his dugout home at Pie Town, New Mexico." View full size. 4x5 Kodachrome transparency by Russell Lee. Another example of the dugout-style structure used for the homesteader dwellings and church in the Dead Ox Flat photos. Before industry and technology gave us sawmills and frame houses, this is how the average person lived in much of the world. The dugout or pit house, with sod roof, log walls and earthen floor, is among the most ancient of human dwellings -- at some point in history your ancestors lived in one. Especially popular among 19th-century settlers in the Great Plains and deserts of the West and Southwest, where trees and other building materials were scarce, dugouts were warmer in winter and cooler in summer than above-ground structures; just about anywhere in North America the ground temperature three feet down is 55 degrees regardless of the season. [Addendum: This picture was taken using Kodachrome sheet film (5 inches by 4 inches) and (probably) a Graflex Speed Graphic press camera. The image you see here was scanned from the positive transparency itself, not a print.]

 

Pie Town Garden: 1940

Pie Town Garden: 1940

September 1940. Garden and dugout home of Jack Whinery, homesteader at Pie Town, New Mexico. View full size. 4x5 Kodachrome transparency: Russell Lee.

 

Society of Friends: 1939

Society of Friends: 1939

October 1939. "All the members of the congregation. Friends church (Quaker)." Mrs. Wardlow and Mrs. Hull are over to the left of the entrance to the dugout. Dead Ox Flat, Malheur County, Oregon. View full size. Photo: Dorothea Lange.

 

Milwaukee Boneyard: 1936

Milwaukee Boneyard: 1936

April 1936. "Junk, with living quarters close by." Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 3¼ x 4¼ nitrate negative photographed by Carl Mydans. View full size.

 

Mrs. Wardlaw: 1939

Mrs. Wardlaw: 1939

October 1939. Mrs. Wardlow [Wardlaw] at the Society of Friends church. Dead Ox Flat, Malheur County, Oregon. View full size. Photograph by Dorothea Lange.

 

730 West Winnebago: 1936

730 West Winnebago: 1936

April 1936. View from living quarters at 730 West Winnebago Street, looking back down the alley. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. View full size. Photo by Carl Mydans.

 

L Street Alleyway: 1935

L Street Alleyway: 1935

November 1935. Alley near L Street NW with Blake School in background. Washington, D.C. View full size. Photograph by Carl Mydans.

 
 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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