The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including, but not limited to, "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2014 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE TOY DEPARTMENT, 1913

Whirly Show: 1921

Whirly Show: 1921

New York, July 5, 1921. "Whirl Girls." Our second look at chorus girls for "The Broadway Whirl," a musical comedy revue at the Times Square Theatre. 5x7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. View full size.

 

Hesitation Step

The whirl girl all the way at the back of the line has posed with a nice little hesitation step. She is the cutest one of them all IMHO. At least she knew how to stand. Very nicely shaped too.

Shaped properly

Say what you will about what part of which girl looks good or bad but the legs on the girl in front are well shaped. Very well shaped.

Just like Playboy

I'm glad I read Shorpy only for the articles.

Drag Potential

If you put five male celebrities in drag, the results would be, from left to right:

1. Lyle Lovett
2. Michael J. Pollard
3. Vic Morrow
4. George Harrison
5. Gary Sinise

Performed barefoot?

I wonder what kind of performance they gave. When we say "chorus girl" today I imagine something like the Rockettes. But if these girls danced, they would have been quite limited in what they could do without hurting themselves if they did it in bare feet. Yet there they are, without even socks on, and the audience is there in the background so this must be their full costume.

Maybe they just stood there and sang, without dancing? But then why wouldn't they have fashionable footwear (for the period)? Even the name "whirl girls" suggests they were dancers.

A mystery.

[They're dressed a bathing-girl (beach) scene. - Dave]

Can't Help It

I normally loathe the folks who make fun of Shorpy's maidens of yore. But I can't help saying that this photo must have been taken on the day that the bored, middle-aged wives took over. The real Whirl Girls must have been tied up in some closet when this was being taken.

Girl #2

The second girl has a lovely look of wistful self-doubt and longing that is sharply fetching.

Rich in Girls

"New Summer Show at The Times Square Is Rich in Girls and Has Good Comedians." New York Times review.

Like a mirror

What really blows me about this picture is that I closely resemble (or did when I was younger) the girl in front. Same hair, nose, even expression. Very odd feeling.

Chorus girls..

They had ambition, they had.......well, they had ambition.

Lyle Lovett

I think I found your grandma.

Far right ->

The one all the way to the right is looking right at me. Look at her! She's HOT! I think she likes me. Someone introduce me to her. The way she's smiling at me makes my heart flutter. What should I say to her? Is she going with anybody? Should I ask her out?

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2014 Shorpy Inc.