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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • FLY CANADIAN PACIFIC, c. 1950s

Top Dog: 1865

Top Dog: 1865

March 1865. "City Point, Virginia. General U.S. Grant's horse Cincinnati." Wet plate glass negative, left half of stereograph pair. View full size.

 

Saddlebreds

Today's American Saddlebreds come from the bloodstock from the Civil War.

Today's Saddlebred: http://www.saddlebred.com/

Boston, Lexington, and Cincinnati.

Wikipedia has Cincinnati's pedigree as the son of Lexington, the fastest four-mile thoroughbred in the United States (time 7:19.75). Lexington's sire was Boston, a willful, hard to handle racehorse, who raced until he was ten and won 40 of 45 starts.

American Saddle Horse

Apparently Grant was not only an excellent rider but bred horses as well.

He raised Arabians but the horse in this picture was an
American Saddle Horse.

"The American Saddle Horse gained fame as a breed during the Civil War, 1861-1865. Saddlebreds served as the mounts of many famous generals; Lee on Traveller, Grant on Cincinnati, Sherman rode Lexington, and Stonewall Jackson's mount was Little Sorrell. The three aforementioned horses were American type with close Thoroughbred crosses, and the latter was of pacing stock. "

http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/horses/saddlebred/index.htm

Pretty horse

That is one more handsome horse and a pleasure to look at. Too bad he is a yankee.....

Be Still My Heart

Nice fetlocks!

Beautiful Horse

I wonder what the breeding was??

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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