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Member Photos


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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VOLUNTEER FOR VICTORY

Emergency Hospital: 1920

Emergency Hospital: 1920

Washington, D.C., circa 1920. "Emergency Hospital, interior." The latest in lab facilities. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Speed Regulator

The switch box over the woman's shoulder is a speed regulator for the drum-shaped centrifuge right behind her at her feet. The actual spinner head is inside; the drum is meant to contain the infectious glass shrapnel if the test tubes shatter at high speed.

Speculation

It appears the technician at the table ordered the Kung Pao Chicken for lunch again.

At least I hope so!

What's that?

What is the thing on the wall over the guy with the microscope? Also, check out the switch box on the wall behind the lady.

Photographer's instructions

"Alright, everybody, look busy!"

Hazardous Duty

I hope they have an EMT standing by whenever the custodian clambers atop the autoclave to wind the clock!

Naked

Love the bare lightbulb!

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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