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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • NORTH TUSCANY COAST, 1948

White Line: 1924

White Line: 1924

Washington, D.C., circa 1924. "Continental White Line bus." Who can pinpoint the location here? National Photo Co. Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Truck Marque

What is the name on the radiator/grille below the fluting on top of the radiator? It appears that the manufacturer's name might be written diagonally below.

Also, note the interesting mechanical device attached to the door. When the door opens up, the step automatically goes down.

The New Blagden Alley

Atkinson Garage is soon to be open as R.J. Powers' restaurant Rogue24. The back doors of Wagtime and Long View Gallery are straight ahead. It's gratifying to see what is happening in DC these days, and wondrous and to see what was happening in DC those days. With a few decades of disrepair in between.

I'm so lucky!

How lucky am I? My software business is located directly across the alley from this building. Blagden Alley rocks; we love being there amongst the history, trying to build something new.

Re: That Hat

By day: dutiful civic transport. By night: wanton destroyer of ladies' millinery.

Gorgeous!

I'm not usually very interested in vehicles of that age but that's got to be one of the most beautiful bus bodies I've ever seen. The designer was obviously someone who saw coachbuilding as an art rather than a job; just look at the sweep of the roof line - there's not a straight section in it.

You Da' Man, Cranch!

This is the sort of thing that makes Shorpy the best website ever.

Psssssst

I don't think I'd have a lot of faith in that right front tire. It looks like a bad "re-capping" job is about to delaminate - blowout!

"Auto Repair Inc."

Another view of the old garage in Blagden Alley. Note the ghost lettering on the beam across the garage door. Google Maps goofed on the street name's spelling!

Little has changed

Between the photo and the Google pic. Can even see where the drain cover in the foreground was -- the dark circle on the left in the Street View.

[Wouldn't it be funny if that hat was still there. - Dave]

That hat

Is that a smashed hat in the foreground? Very nice omnibus.

1244 Blagden Alley NW

Atkinson Garage

According to an ad in the Washington Post (May 7, 1922), Atkinson Garage was in "Blagdon's Court" between 9th and 10th, M and N Streets NW.

[That didn't take long! Now called Blagden Alley. - Dave]

Air!

It doesn't appear that there was a great deal of ventilation for this omnibus. In a time before antiperspirants and in wool clothing, no ventilation would be a bad thing. I can just imagine some of the tours were rather ripe.

It could smell like the Lancaster County Farmer's Market on a rainy Friday in July after the Amish have been picking corn all week. The kind of smell that's nearly visible.

[The four-section windshield is hinged and opens for ventilation. Deodorants, which go back to the 19th century, were well established by the 1920s. - Dave]

Location

I think it's right in front of the Atkinson Garage Company.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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