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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE CITY OF RUINS AND ROSES, c. 1930

Push Harder: 1908

Push Harder: 1908

Clement-Bayard dirigible in shed in France circa 1908. View full size. George Grantham Bain Collection.

 

All time greatest captions

Some time ago I suggested a new page where commenters could vote for their all-time favorite captions ("Best Nap Ever", "No Soup for YOU!" ...) My idea didn't take root, but if it ever does, add my vote for this one. Milk-out-the-nose funny!

Clément-Bayard dirigible #1

The Clément-Bayard dirigible #1 was 56.25 m long, had a diameter of 10.58 m, and a cubic measure of 3,500 m3. It had two Clement-Bayard motors of 115 h.p. (if French horses had the same power as the US ones).

Its hangars were at Montesson (near Paris, now Yvelines), probably the ones shown on the picture. Clément-Bayard dirigible #1's maiden flight was at Sartrouville (plaine de Montesson) october, 28 1908, piloted by Kapférer.

On november, 1st of 1908 it effectuated a raid of 200 km between Sartrouville, Pierrefonds, Paris, Auteuil and back to Sartrouville in less than 5 hours, setting a french record for length and speed on a closed circuit.

Before the end of 1908 the docile and fast (50 km/h) ship made 29 flights. Adolphe Clément-Bayard tried to sell it to the french government at 500.000 francs. But the government finds it to expensive. Finally it is the russian czar who buys it.

August, 23 1909, during a demonstration for a delegation of the russian army, piloted by Capazza, it raises up to 1.550 meters (a record), stays more than 2 hours above 1.200 meters (another record), but at the landing at Maisons-Laffitte the machine is captured by a heavy gust of wind and falls into the river Seine. After being repaired it finally sets head for Russia, where it will be renamed Berkut.

See Clément-Bayard, sans peur et sans reproche for more photos and a detailed story (in French!) about Adolphe Clément-Bayard and his achievements in various fields.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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