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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE TOY DEPARTMENT, 1913

Jumpers: 1919

Jumpers: 1919

Washington, D.C., or vicinity. "Horse shows, miscellaneous, 1919. Unidentified jumpers." Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Giddyap

Great pic. You can feel the power in these magnificent animals.

Dapper Dan

The gent on the right - striped tie, pinned collar, french cuffs, casually looking over at his competition knowing he's got this one in the bag. The only giveaway in his relaxed demeanor - the tight grip on the reins. Excellent!

No Helmet? No Vest? No Problem!

Ah, the olden days of jumping, long before safety was even a thought.

If the standard on the right is to be believed, they're jumping 4 feet and have arrived nearly at the same time as a pair. Very hard to do, and rarely seen other than the occasional hunt night at the larger shows these days.

I'll also hazard a guess that the bits are sewn into the bridles, meaning that bridle was for that horse only.

The riders' equitation, though not textbook, gives both horses plenty of freedom to really crack their backs over the fence. And in terms of jumping a horse, that's a good thing.

Great picture, hope there are more!

Mr. Ed leaves the the farm.

Don't involve me in your gambling debts, Wilbur.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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