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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THERE'S NO MEDICINE FOR REGRET, 1945

Grease: 1920

Grease: 1920

Washington, D.C., circa 1920. "York Auto Supply Co., Georgia and New Hampshire Avenues N.W." National Photo glass negative. View full size.

 

York Auto Supply

I posted a brief history of this site a while ago, which you can read here.

Is that the gas pump?

That is a cool looking piece if it is, when I first looked I thought it might be a vacuum! Like to put that up in the front drive.

No Heat

From all the frost on the windows, I'd say the building had very little heat or none at all.

[I feel like such an old geezer explaining this. But: That would probably be soap on the windows. The glass is obscured because, sign notwithstanding, the place is still under construction and not open for business yet. - Dave]

Unusual in Washington

I like the sign in the background, lower left: "Free Air."

From service station to Metro station

This is today the location of the Georgia Avenue-Petworth Station.


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Classical Gas

The place looks decidedly closed, despite the sign. All that remains of the site today are the three row houses visible at the right. They have lost their porches and the brick is now painted. With its angular shape, large areas of plate glass and horizontal lines, this building really foreshadowed a lot of gas stations that were to follow in the '50s.


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Pardon our dust

Still under construction, despite the sign. I wonder what brand-new yet antique equipment is in the crates. Love the ancient gas pump.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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