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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • UNFAIR TO BABIES, 1936

Chevrolet: 1926

Chevrolet: 1926

Rockville, Maryland, circa 1926. "Montgomery County Motor Co." Headquarters for "quality at low cost." National Photo Co. glass negative. View full size.

 

Snubbers

If you have the time, could we please see a closeup of the Gabriel Snubbers sign? It looks like a fantastic graphic. Thanks!

Chevy

I love the reflections in their windshields, especially the Chevrolet bow-tie in the first car's glass.

Takes me back

In 1952 I bought a '26 Chev from the original owner, who purchased it at the factory. It had 26,000 miles on it, I was 14 and it only took me a year to run it into the ground.

Who snubs Gabriel?

I was mystified by the "Gabriel Snubbers" display card until I found out it was a brand of shock absorber. And these cars look like they could use some serious snubbing.

How green was my Chevy

A 1926 Chevrolet Landau Sedan with optional bumper, in living color!

I love the optional bumper display!

Not to mention the impressive display of parallel parking.

As will I !!!

If I could just find Mr. Peabody's Wayback machine I would love to go and get one. And an extra for the wife.

Give 'em the Shaft

How appropriate that the item at the top of the display board of replacement parts is an axle half-shaft, which this era of Chevrolets were notorious for snapping. I guess they didn't take the hint from Ford to use vanadium in their steel.

It's also amusing that the bumper at the front of the rear-most car isn't attached, but mounted on a display stand. They were still optional, on low-priced cars.

Finally

A new car I could afford! In 1926 these ranged from $510 to $765. Too bad I'm 85 years too late.

Eh Toro

Those front spring mounts could do serious damage to the back of a Corolla methinks.

I'll Take Two !

How utterly beautiful they are. BOY would I like one of those cars! You rarely see a photograph of a mint 1920s car, much less such a good one. You can smell the new rubber of the tires.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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