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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • ROSES BY VINCENT VAN GOGH, 1890

ATV: 1863

ATV: 1863

August 1863. Bealeton, Va. "Capt. Henry Page, assistant quartermaster, at Army of Potomac headquarters with horse." Wet plate glass negative. View full size.

 

In the front with gear

You can tell from this soldiers face that being a quartermaster during the civil war was vastly different from what it is today. It must have brutal constantly being attacked while trying to supply the infantry on the front line.

Branded by Uncle Sam

Check out the "U.S." on the horse above his left front leg. Amazing detail in these old pix!

A horse straight out of 2010

That's a good looking horse. So many horses in ACW photos look kind of weedy. Though I imagine said horse didn't look so well-muscled and shiny two years later, if he managed to survive. And either that's a tall horse or the captain's a short dude (or standing in a hole).

A Picture for the Folks at Home

Fiercest-looking supply officer I've ever seen!

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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