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About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
 
NEW FROM THE VINTAGRAPH VAULTS • AUSTRIAN MOUNTAIN MUSIC, c 1930s

Woodman Home: 1919

Woodman Home: 1919

High school student Christine Bader assembled a photo scrapbook from 1919 through her graduation in 1921. In it she pasted pictures of her friends, family, and places she visited. I bought her scrapbook at an ephemera show in Pasadena, California.

Some of the places she visited were sanatoriums (tuberculosis hospitals). Woodman Home in Colorado Springs, Colorado was one of those. She does not say who the four women posed in the gateway were. The hospital was set up by the printer's union to handle both tuberculosis and black lung disease in printers, which was caused when they breathed in the carbon-based inks of the era. View full size.

Not Quite a Bikini

Not Quite a Bikini

Fifteen years earlier it would have been simply shocking for teen girls to be seen in public with so much skin exposed. But on the cusp of the Roaring Twenties, fashion had changed. Compared to the middy dresses of earlier bathers, this was nearly a bikini.

Photograph was taken by Christine Bader some time between 1919 and 1921. I found it in a photo album she made during her high school years. On the back is a purple rubber stamp with a triangular logo featuring the graphic of a native American in feather headdress, and the words Illini Quality Service. This suggests, that though she took the photos, she sent them out for commercial processing.

Dovid Ziv circa 1910-20

Dovid Ziv circa 1910-20

My great-grandfather, Dovid Ziv (1840-1921) He fathered 18 children by two wives. View full size.

Hungarian-American Emigres

Hungarian-American Emigres

My maternal grandfather's family (three brothers, three sisters) emigrated from Hungary about the turn of the century and settled in the predominantly Hungarian-Jewish Logan section of Philadelphia. Some of them were photographed at some sort of costume event.

I think that males number 1, 2, 3 and 5 from the left were my grandfather Nelson Blass (1884-1952), uncle Eugene Blass (1890-1953), uncle Rudy Polya (1889-1987) and uncle Armin Braun (1890-1957). The only female whom I recognize is [middle] aunt Sara Blass Polya (1888-1973). View full size.

Leo C. Ziv: 1915

Leo C. Ziv: 1915

My maternal grandfather Leo C. Ziv (1890-1971) emigrated from Lithuania about 1910. Like many young Jewish immigrants, he became an itinerant peddler in Bucks, Montgomery, Northampton and Lehigh counties, Pennsylvania. At age 25, he married my 17 year-old grandmother. Two years later, he was inducted into the Army, served in he American Expeditionary Force.

Private Leo C. Ziv: 1917.

Private Leo C. Ziv: 1917.

This image of my maternal grandfather Leo C. Ziv (1890-1971) [center] was probably taken during his training at Fort Dix, New Jersey. As part of the American Expeditionary Force the following year, his lungs were burned by a cloud of mustard gas floating into his trench. He had to expectorate into a paper sack for the remaining 53 years of his life. View full size.

Helen Solomon Ziv circa 1917

Helen Solomon Ziv circa 1917

My grandmother Helen Solomon Ziv (1898-1988). View full size.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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