SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
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6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
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Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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© 2018 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
 
NEW FROM THE VINTAGRAPH VAULTS • SEVILLE SPRING FESTIVAL, 1929

Curious About the Dress Form: 1957

Curious About the Dress Form: 1957

My mother’s whole life was (and to an extent still is) seen through a lens of apparel. Her mother was a milliner (made women’s hats during the first quarter of the 20th century, when everybody wore hats). Her father was a pattern-maker. My mother graduated from FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) in New York City. She designed and made her clothes. She designed and made my clothes. She never bought a curtain, bedspread, or furniture slip cover in her life. She made them. If you were looking for her in the house, she would not be doing heavy duty cleaning. We had hired help for that. But she might be making fashion sketches, or sitting at the sewing machine.

Here, three-year-old me stands on a seat cushion she made, which is on one of our Paul McCobb mid-century modern chairs, to examine to polka dot fabric she has draped on her dress form, as she starts the pattern-making process for another dress.

My Great-Grandparents: 1980

My Great-Grandparents: 1980

These are my paternal great-grandparents Charles and Ella Hawkins (my grandfather's parents), standing outside their home in Lake City, S.C. in the snow. View full size.

Ernestine Sanders Washington: c.1955

Ernestine Sanders Washington: c.1955

Circa 1955, St. James the Greater Catholic School, Walterboro, South Carolina. Aunt Ernestine is seated at right; she is the eldest sister of my paternal grandfather's mother. She was a beloved teacher and principal, and those are the children whom she taught. She was born in 1894, Charleston, and died in 1963. She previously taught at Burke Industrial School in Charleston and her Catholic roots started as a kid attending St. Peter's Catholic School for colored children, where her mother attended in the 1880s.

Train at Teepookana Tasmania: 1898

Train at Teepookana Tasmania: 1898

Photo is from my children's great-great-grandfather's possessions. Frederick Ormiston Henry was a pioneer trader and early shareholder in the Mt. Lyell Mine. This Mt. Lyell train may be part of an official opening ceremony or possibly the start of the annual picnic trains that took mine workers each year to the Port of Strahan for a company picnic day until the 1960s. The photo is captioned "1898 With best wishes for a prosperous and happy New Year to you all from (Indecipherable)" maybe Prineys Linder?

The Mt. Lyell Mine on the west coast of Tasmania was developed in the 1890s within the vast West Coast Wilderness area. The rail link over the rivers and ranges provided access from 1897 to the (short lived) river Port of Teepookana (pictured). The railway ran until 1963 and reopened as a tourist railway using the original ABT System locomotives on 27 December 2002 as the Abt Wilderness Railway. It stills runs today. View full size.

Ice & Coal: 1936

Ice & Coal: 1936

October 1936. Workers from my great-grandfather's hauling company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. View full size.

The Girls Next Door: 1962

The Girls Next Door: 1962

I apparently invited only six kids to my eighth birthday party, so my mother didn’t make us sit on the floor. These two attendees are Debbie and Darlene: the girls next door. To say we were close was a geographical reality. Though Debbie was younger than me, she was in my grade. Darlene was eleven months younger than her. Their family was Catholic, so they went to Catholic school, which I did not.

Their mother was the coolest (You can see her here) because she worked at a toy store. That meant they got all the trendy toys that my parents would not buy. Their father and my father both worked at RCA in Princeton New Jersey, so they car pooled to work together. And when the Neils did something fun, their family often included me. It was their father, Clyde, who taught me to ride a bicycle. When he taught both of them, he just added me into the group.

Economy Run: 1962

Economy Run: 1962

My dad entered and often won economy runs with his MG Midget. He would modify it for the events and then convert it back to his daily driver. Mansfield, Ohio 1962. View full size.

TV and Me: 1955

TV and Me: 1955

In a previous picture I mentioned our family TV. But in that picture, the doors to it were closed, making it into a piece of blonde wood, mid-century modern furniture. It was a 1951 model RCA Kendall 17T174. We only had RCA TVs because my father worked at RCA Laboratories, in Princeton New Jersey, where he was involved in the development of color television. His slippers are on the floor behind me. To the right of them is a wheeled piece of blonde wood furniture that my mother called a tea wagon. Behind them all is a closer look at the very fifties fabric of the curtains my mother sewed for that living room. View full size.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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