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6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
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Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
 
NEW FROM THE VINTAGRAPH VAULTS • STAY ONE JUMP AHEAD OF TROUBLE

San Luis Obispo: 1955

San Luis Obispo: 1955

Summer 1955, San Luis Obispo, California. The days when old-looking buildings downtown really were old and Studebakers could roam the streets freely. My brother's Anscochome slide. View full size.

Queen of the Mustangs: 1966

Queen of the Mustangs: 1966

July 4, 1966. Twin Cities Fourth of July Parade on Magnolia Avenue in Larkspur, California. And if two brand-new, dealer stock Mustangs weren't enough, an early Studebaker Lark in the used car lot. The other Twin City was neighboring Corte Madera. My Ektachrome slide. View full size.

Salmon Kitchen In Use

Salmon Kitchen In Use

July 1964. My mother is a blur of activity in this available light Kodachrome; judging from the grates piled up on the right front burner, she's cleaning the O'Keefe & Merritt's chrome top. View full size.

Red Light and Siren: 1963

Red Light and Siren: 1963

Firemen and volunteers cling to the back of the Larkspur Fire Department's 1946 American-LaFrance engine as it roars down Magnolia Ave. on the way to a call one late afternoon in 1963. These days we're used to seeing firemen suited up like they were about to take a moon walk; check out the casual attire here. Only one guy even has his fireman's hat on; two of the volunteers are sporting baseball caps. Everybody else is in shirtsleeves, even the full-time guy at the wheel (although it's his official blue uniform shirt). That's our house at the very top of the frame.

The fire department had been a governmental entity only 6 years. Up until 1957, it was privately operated by the volunteers, completely funded by dances held at The Rose Bowl, an outdoor dance floor under the redwoods that featured name bands and drew crowds from all over the Bay Area each Saturday during the summer months. My Kodachrome slide.

Sangria Seventies

Sangria Seventies

If a single photo could capture 1970s Northern California culture, this might be it. The hair; the clothes; the round oak table; the funky old apartment with painted-over wainscoting; the giant bowl of sangria. I ought to know, I was there. In fact, there I am, at the left, at my brother's Santa Cruz place with his wife (lower left) and their friends in October 1973. My brother's Ektachrome slide. View full size.

Gentlemen, start your engines! 1963

Gentlemen, start your engines! 1963

Here we have #8, the Red Racer. This is in Louisville about 1963 or so. At some point after this was taken, my dad and I went flying down the driveway of our apartment building. However, we neglected to notice the freshly paved asphalt until it was too late, and we trashed Red Racer and ourselves in the process! I recall my grandfather "J" drilled a hole in the back so he could push Red Racer with a stick. My last name's hand-painted on the side just like the Indy drivers! I think there were wooden blocks attached to the pedals so I could reach 'em, too.

Belmont Park : 1959

Belmont Park : 1959

The Jockeys are looking at President and Mrs. Eisenhower during their visit to Belmont Park. View full size.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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