SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
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Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SEVILLE SPRING FESTIVAL, 1929

No Soap, No Girls: 1960

No Soap, No Girls: 1960

After the bathyscaphe Trieste descended to the deepest part of the ocean in January 1960, I made a "copy" out of cardboard boxes, cellophane and marker pens Dad brought home from work. That's me as a nine-year-old explorer at the window. View full size.

85 Leabrook Lane: 1964

85 Leabrook Lane: 1964

As I have said before, my mother was decidedly Mrs. Sewandsew. Along with making us matching RCA Picnic shirts in Princeton, she made matching red dresses for her, me, and a tiny one that was an exact replica of ours for my Barbie doll. These were not special occasion clothes. They had great big pockets with pointed tops (since she knew I would wear, and wear, and wear anything with a big pocket for me to stash stuff in) and were of a pattern she designed which she identified as princess line. And yes, the faux pearl beads, and medium heels were the way she dressed on a regular day. She did not have house dresses or cleaning house clothes.

Baby boomers will recognize the square object on the steps that you can see between me and my brother as a milk box. Each morning a man from a local dairy company delivered fresh milk to our house, using it.

Colonial Williamsburg: 1964

Colonial Williamsburg: 1964

On Labor Day Weekend, just before I started fifth grade, my parents took me on an educational vacation to Colonial Williamsburg. There we did the basic tourist things that one does in Williamsburg, including pose for pictures in the stocks. It was one of many times I and my mother wore the matching red dresses she had made. My brother did not go with us because he was too little. He was left with a family that my father knew from work.

Public Humiliation, Tourist Style: 1964

Public Humiliation, Tourist Style: 1964

Another shot from our Colonial Williamsburg vacation that took place on Labor Day Weekend 1964. In this case, my co-conspirator, being punished, with me, is my father.

The Bedford Blue Cuffs: 195x

The Bedford Blue Cuffs: 195x

This is one of our dad's posed shots, me the little guy at bat, along with my brothers in our front yard, Bedford, Quebec, late 1950s. View full size.

Indiana Rambler: 1962

Indiana Rambler: 1962

South Bend, Indiana. My brothers with the brand-spanking-new "Sonata Blue" (light blue) Rambler station wagon our parents bought shortly before I was born. View full size.

Just Horsing Around: 1963

Just Horsing Around: 1963

My pajama-clad father plays pony to me and my equally pajama-clad brother on a Sunday morning. Though the pony was not an every Sunday activity, lounging about on Sunday mornings was. There was no rush to get dressed on a Sunday morning because we weren’t going anywhere.

At the Y: c.1900

At the Y: c.1900

"Grand Rapids YWCA" is written in pencil on the back of this print from Michigan. There is no date, but the Grand Rapids YWCA was opened in 1900. To my eye the outfits do not look much more recent than that. View full size.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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