SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
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6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
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Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
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About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SEVILLE SPRING FESTIVAL, 1929

Mommie's Dearest: 1957

Mommie's Dearest: 1957

Here I am in 1957 with my mother in a photo booth. Have a seat, close the curtain, drop a quarter in the slot and you get four consecutive photographs automatically. I don't know where this booth was. Perhaps at a Woolworth's? The image printed directly onto specially-treated paper that went through a chemical bath. No film or negatives existed. And no intimidating photographer. The photo-booth pictures I have are good quality considering how they were made, with no apparent fading. My guess is that the booths must have required frequent maintenance. View full size.

Sittin' at the Ritz: 195x

Sittin' at the Ritz: 195x

One of my grandfather's Kodachromes from the 1950s while he was in Atlantic City for a convention. This is the Ritz Carlton and you can see a few people lounging on the balcony overlooking the ocean and the drop-off area. There appears to be a valet parking area with some very important looking black sedans. View full size.

Schizo Kit Kat and Me: 1954

Schizo Kit Kat and Me: 1954

My mother snapped this picture of my father doing diaper duty with six -month-old me. What I like about the picture is the paranoid schizophrenic Kit Kat Clock on the wall behind us. A rare bit of whimsy in my room, it clicked quite loudly as its slit eyes rolled left, then right, while its pendulum tail swung. Originally designed by Earl Arnault in 1932 for Allied Manufacturing Company, this original plug-in version was made from the thirties into the fifties. The earliest ones have only two lower paws. This one has four, indicating that it was from the end of the Allied era.

Kit Kat clocks enjoyed a pop culture revival in the 1980s and are still made today by the California Clock Company. Contemporary editions are battery operated, say Kit Kat on their face, and include a necklace or bow tie that none of the original clocks had. View full size.

Jerry Lewis in Chicago: 194x

Jerry Lewis in Chicago: 194x

Jerry Lewis performed often at the Chez Paree night club in downtown Chicago. He and my dad Mel soon became good friends. One day in 1946 Jerry visited Shutan Camera Co. to buy his very first movie camera for an important occasion: the birth of his first child Gary. That purchase may have spawned Jerry’s love for film making. This mid-1940s photo shows him in our Washington Street store with arm around manager Irving Kaye, Shutan employee Manny Reeder, and Mel Shutan on the far right. Jerry and my dad were both in their early 20s. Jerry Lewis became a family friend and continued to buy camera equipment from Shutan thru the 1990s. Leica and Nikon were always his choice in 35mm equipment. View full size.

Say It with Shutan's: 193x

Say It with Shutan's: 193x

c1930s. A storefront window display of Shutan Camera Co. on West Washington Street in downtown Chicago. My grandfather Edwin Shutan offered a large selection of quality Christmas cards and fine writing instruments - and always arranged the displays meticulously. View full size.

Rent-a-Book: 1940

Rent-a-Book: 1940

Circa 1940: In an effort to generate more foot traffic in his Chicago camera store, my grandfather Edwin Shutan dedicated a section to a book rental library and hired a staff librarian, Miss Michaels (shown). Edwin charged just 10 cents for three days with no deposit or membership required. His library was immaculate and well-stocked with all the latest titles from authors such as Thornton Wilder, Alexander Woollcott and Lloyd C. Douglas, to name a few. View full size.

Nikon in the Loop: 1959

Nikon in the Loop: 1959

1959: Sons Harold and Melvin Shutan being shown the finer points of a new Nikon F by father Edwin, along with Robert “Mac” McElroy on the right. The Nikon F was introduced in 1959, became Nikon's best seller, and made Nikon the professionals choice. This particular Nikon F was brought to Shutan Camera on West Washington Street in Chicago by Joeseph Ehrenreich. Joe's company Ehrenreich Photo-Optical Industries (EPOI) of Garden City, NJ was the sole distributor for Nikon in the USA. In 1981, Nippon Kogaku, the Tokyo-based maker of Nikon cameras acquired EPOI. Soon after, Nikon USA was formed. View full size.

The Rexo Team: 192x

The Rexo Team: 192x

Circa 1920s: My grandfather Edwin Shutan, (middle row, far left) played in a local baseball league. He was the team manager. They played in Humboldt Park and Garfield Park on Chicago's West side. When the gambling got heavy on the sidelines, Edwin decided he wanted no part of that, so he quit playing! Rexo was a manufacturer of chemicals and photo products. View full size.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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