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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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© 2014 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE TOY DEPARTMENT, 1913

Cars+Trucks

Trail, British Columbia 1959

Trail, British Columbia 1959

My father worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and when we moved from Ontario backwoods to the City of Trail, we rented a railway house between the tracks and the Cominco smelter. Our front yard was the parking lot and our back was the railway tracks. The trains shuttling ore passed so close that I could hand the engineer a magazine from our upstairs window. It was difficult to sleep the first few days in the city, but after a week the engines passing by our window didn't disturb us one wink. This was a time of tension with the USSR and I believe we were one of the targets of the Soviets. At the time, Cominco was the largest non-ferrous smelter in the world, providing zinc and aluminum to the free market. The smelter still stands but our old residence is gone. Good riddance. View full size.

New York to Paris: 1908

New York to Paris: 1908

February 12, 1908. Montague Roberts in Times Square driving the Thomas Flyer at the start of the New York to Paris automobile race 100 years ago today. Five months later the car rolled into Paree and won, with considerable drama along the way. There's an entertaining account of the competition in the New York Times, which sponsored the event a century ago. View full size. 5x7 glass negative by George Grantham Bain, whose photos illustrate the NYT article.

 

Bridge Wreck: 1925

Bridge Wreck: 1925

June 17, 1925. "Klingle Ford Bridge wreck" in Washington, D.C., just off (and under) Connecticut Avenue. 4x5 glass negative, National Photo Company Collection. View full size. Who can identify the car?

 

Ak-Sar-Ben, Ah-a-Mo: 1938

Ak-Sar-Ben, Ah-a-Mo: 1938

November 1938. The Ak-sar-ben toll bridge over the Missouri River between Iowa and Nebraska at Omaha. View full size. Photograph by John Vachon.

 

Omaha: 1938

Omaha: 1938

November 1938. Omaha, Nebraska. "Cars parked diagonally along a row of parking meters." View full size. Photograph by John Vachon for the FSA.

 

Parked Girl: 1941

Parked Girl: 1941

August 1941. Cars in the business district of Brattleboro, Vermont. 35mm nitrate negative by Jack Delano for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 

Billy Mitchell: 1923

Billy Mitchell: 1923

September 25, 1923. Brigadier General William Mitchell in Washington, D.C. An important figure in the development of military aviation, "Billy" Mitchell is regarded as the father of the U.S. Air Force. His criticism of Army and Navy leaders after the crash of the airship Shenandoah in 1925 led to a court-martial and subsequent resignation. When it came to clothes, cars and horses, he was a connoisseur of the good life. View full size. National Photo Co. Collection.

 
 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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