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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
 
NEW FROM THE VINTAGRAPH VAULTS • VOLUNTEER FOR VICTORY

Now Hear This: 1929

Now Hear This: 1929

Front panel of The Apparatus posted here yesterday. "United States Veterans Hospital. Designed and constructed by Radio Construction Corp. Washington, D.C." Circa 1929 Harris & Ewing negative. View full size.

 

The Apparatus: 1929

The Apparatus: 1929

UPDATE: See the front panel here.

Summer 1929 or thereabouts in Washington, D.C. An impressive rack. Of what? Unlabeled Harris & Ewing glass negative, Part 1 of 2. View full size.

 

Radio Alfresco: 1929

Radio Alfresco: 1929

UPDATE: Our subject is Dr. James Harris Rogers (1856-1929) of Hyattsville, Md., inventor of the "loop aerial" and holder of numerous patents in telegraphy, telephony and radio:

August 16, 1929. A Veteran Inventor. About 6 miles from Washington, on the edge of the little hamlet of Hyattsville, Md., may be found Dr. James Harris Rogers, wizard inventor, now 80 years old, retired from his work but still erect and energetic. It was Dr. Rogers who during the war proved that water as well as earth and air is a medium for the transmission of electro-magnetic waves. Through the "well" located on his property, high officials heard German official reports.

Radio apparatus and unidentified operator circa 1930 in this unlabeled Harris & Ewing plate. Who can help us fill in the blanks? View full size.

 

Steampunk iPad: 1922

Steampunk iPad: 1922

Circa 1922, the Fiske Reading Machine in the hand of its inventor, Rear Admiral Bradley Fiske. Where's the Home button on this thing? View full size.

 

Ear Buds: 1924

Ear Buds: 1924

Washington, D.C., circa 1924. "Radio at Garfield Hospital." Someday, fellows, they'll make a telegraph you can carry around in your pocket! View full size.

 

Keypunch Orchestra: 1937

Keypunch Orchestra: 1937

June 1937. "Baltimore, Maryland. For every Social Security account number issued an 'employee master card' is made in the Social Security board records office. Testifying data, given on the application blank form SS-5, is transferred to this master card in the form of upended quadrangular holes, punched by key punch machines, which have a keyboard like a typewriter. Each key struck by an operator causes a hole to be punched in the card. The position of a hole determines the letter or number other machines will reproduce from the master card. From this master card is made an actuarial card, to be used later for statistical purposes. The master card also is used in other machines which sort them numerically, according to account numbers, alphabetically according to the name code, translate the holes into numbers and letters, and print the data on individual ledger sheets, indexes, registry of accounts and other uses. The photograph above shows records office workers punching master cards on key punch machines." Whew. Longest caption ever? Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Modern Medicine: 1924

Modern Medicine: 1924

Washington, D.C., circa 1924. "Radio at Garfield Hospital." We're happy to report this patient has been discharged. National Photo glass negative. View full size.

 
 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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