The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
 
NEW FROM THE VINTAGRAPH VAULTS • WASHINGTON CROSSING THE PIES

Hooked Up: 1919

Hooked Up: 1919

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. "Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. equipment." More communications gear at what seems to be the Capitol. The box on the left bears the nameplates of Leeds & Northrup, Philadelphia, and Western Electric. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size | The knobs.

 

The Operators: 1919

The Operators: 1919

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. "Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. switchboards." Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Wired: 1919

Wired: 1919

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. "Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. wiring." A behind the scenes look at communications tech some 80 years after the telegraph tapped out its first message. Harris & Ewing glass negative. View full size.

 

Dial D for Danger: 1919

Dial D for Danger: 1919

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. "Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. equipment." Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Dymaxion House: 1941

Dymaxion House: 1941

May 1941. "Diamaxion [Dymaxion] house, metal, adapted corn bin, built by Butler Brothers, Kansas City. Designed and promoted by R. Buckminster Fuller." Medium format negative by Marion Post Wolcott. View full size.

 

Snowmobile: 1948

Snowmobile: 1948

1948, Ste-Anne-de-la-Perade, Quebec. Is it a car, a Plane? No, it's a snowmobile! View full size.

Beam Me Up: 1979

Beam Me Up: 1979

April 1979, still in the early days of the home video revolution, in which I was something of a pioneer. Here I'm at the controls of my Advent VideoBeam projection television, which threw a 5.75-foot wide image onto a silvered screen. I got it in 1976 and my first Betamax VCR the following year - #2 is on the bottom shelf, a 2-hour capable SL-8200, replacing the 1-hour-only SL-7200. The gizmo on the shelf above the Betamax is an Atari Video Music. You ran audio into it, hooked it up to your TV and it produced garish animated abstract electronic patterns bouncing around in response to the musical content, the parameters of which you could control via a bunch of knobs and switches. Devo apparently used one in an early music video. It was, like, far out man. View full size.

This is in the video room a friend and I built in the basement of my folks' Larkspur house. The window in the back is for the projection of Super-8 films onto the VideoBeam screen via a clever arrangement of front-surfaced mirrors, as that wall is only a foot or so from the huge old gravity furnace. The wide-angle lens distorts the door frame angle.

Just last year I got my third projection video system, the largest yet, and in adjusted dollars it was the cheapest of the three.

Kodachrome (Konica Autoreflex T) via self-timer and bounce flash (Vivitar 273).

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2014 Shorpy Inc.