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Hill of the Wreck: 1900

Hill of the Wreck: 1900

A crumpled glider destroyed by the wind on Hill of the Wreck in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The hill was named after a shipwreck, not the fate of the glider. Photograph by either Orville or Wilbur Wright, Oct. 10, 1900. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Kiting

When my grandfather, born in 1887, wanted to emphasize that a person or thing was moving a high rate of speed, he used the term "a-kitin'," as in "He was coming down the hill a-kitin'." I now understand that in his youth, nothing else moved faster than these gliders or "kites."

Sweet dreams

"Sweet dreams and flying machines,
in pieces on the ground . . ."

If it was easy, anybody could do it.

Thank goodness they weren't burdened by modern bureaucracy, and modern liability and contracts law, else they never would have succeeded. Can you imagine the calls for an investigation in Congress over an obviously dangerous threat to humanity?

Wrights

keep trying guys, you'll get one to fly someday...

Re: Sticks

>> Anybody know what those sticklike are objects on the ground to the right of the glider are? Look like jawbones or bowed slats of a rowboat perhaps.

Driftwood (below).

Hill of the Wreck

Anybody know what those sticklike are objects on the ground to the right of the glider are? Look like jawbones or bowed slats of a rowboat perhaps.

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