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Hotel St. Charles: 1910

Hotel St. Charles: 1910

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1910. "Hotel St. Charles." It's getting to be that time of year again -- the season for bathing-costumes, salt air and Boardwalk rolling chairs. 8x10 glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co. View full size.

 

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Thus It Always Has Been.

And thus it shall always be.

Atlantic City Games

Beautiful building in a beautiful city

And what a great sunny day! Definitely looks like the kind of place I'd like to spend my next vacation.

Double Duty Ramps

This hotel killed two birds with one stone and gave their guests a unique perk. You could ride in your rented stroller back and forth from the beach to the lobby. Also, of course, the wheelchair bound folks are accommodated.

$750

I believe this was the inspiration for St. Charles Place in the board game Monopoly -- rent $750 with a hotel on it!

The Boardwalk

The boardwalk was put up to keep hotel patrons from tracking sand into the lobbies. The St. Charles Hotel was one of the first to benefit. It had its own connection to the boardwalk. St. Charles Place holds a key position on the original Monopoly board, right next to Jail. The Showboat Casino now occupies this location.

Are we having fun yet?

I didn't think so.

Architectural Embellishments

I love those decorations along the top floor. They must have been difficult to put up, especially on that curved fascia.

There is quite a bit of that style work out here in Portland, Oregon, especially on the older buildings built around 1900.

Do Not Pass Go

I hear the rent here is pretty steep--$750 per visit.

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